2022 SRSU Undergraduate & Graduate Symposium – Virtual Presentation Schedule
Monday, April 11th, 2022

Click on a Session Time (left row of the schedule below) to jump down the page and view the Presentation Abstracts, Presenter Videos, & Session Recordings for that Session Time.

Noon-12:50

SRSU Symposium Spotlight Event:
2022 Keynote Address 

Welcome and Keynote IntroductionDr. Bernie Canteñs
SRSU Executive Vice President & Provost 


Keynote Speaker – Dr. Dan Foley
Professor of Biology and Chair of the Department of Natural & Behavioral Sciences (RGC) / Chair of Biology, Geology & Physical Sciences (ALP)  

Starts at Noon
To view keynote photo & bio click on “Noon to 12:50” session time at left.

 
VIEW KEYNOTE EVENT RECORDING

Session
Time
Virtual Room A Virtual Room B
1:00-1:20 Presenter: Gabriela Olivas
Moderator: Dr. Kathy Kay Stein (Literature)
Title: Where Are the Wild Things?: Controversy in Where the Wild Things Are
(start: 1pm)     SESSION EVALUATION FORM
Presenter:  Brandon Mayers
Moderator: Dr. Shanna Moody (Athletic Training)
Title: “The Assessment of Lower Extremity Range of Motion in Division III Collegiate Rodeo Athletes: Comparison of Goniometry, Manual Muscle Testing, and Overhead Squat.”
(start: 1pm)    SESSION EVALUATION FORM

1:30-1:50

Presenter: San Juanita Hernandez
Moderator: Dr.Sally Roche (Literature and psychology)
Title: “Entanglement is Inevitable: The Empathic Response”
(start: 1:30pm)   SESSION EVALUATION FORM
Presenter: Teresa Quintana
Moderator: Dr. Carolyn Barrientes (Theatre Scenic Design)
Title :“Interior Design with a Purpose”
(start: 1:30pm)   
SESSION EVALUATION FORM
2:00-2:20 Presenter: Emily Jillson
Moderator: Dr.Chris Herrera (Health and Human Performance)
Title: “Effects of Pre-Workout Supplementation on Muscular Strength, Muscular endurance and Self-Rated Performance in College Age Women during Menstruation”
(start: 2pm)    SESSION EVALUATION FORM
Presenter: Olivia Gray
Moderator: Ida Hoelscher (Wildlife Management)
Title: “Temporal Resource Partitioning of Aoudad, Desert Bighorn Sheep, and Mule Deer in the Trans-Pecos Region, Texas”
(start: 2pm)   SESSION EVALUATION FORM
2:30-2:50 Presenter: Erin O’Connell
Moderator: Dr. Carlos Gonzalez (Wildlife Management)
Title: “Modeling Pronghorn Behavior and Space-Use: Acclimation of Translocated Pronghorn in the Edwards Plateau”
(start: 2:30pm)   SESSION EVALUATION FORM
Presenter: Emily Card
Moderator: Ida Hoelscher (Wildlife Management)
Title: “Impacts of Woody Plant Removal on Habitat Characteristics and Wintering Grassland Bird Communities in the Trans-Pecos, TX”
(start: 2:30pm)    SESSION EVALUATION FORM
3:00-3:20
Presenter: Melissa Urness
Moderator: Dr. Carolyn Barrientes (Theatre)
Title: “Period Research into 1930’s English Interiors for Theatre Scenic Design”
(start: 3pm)    SESSION EVALUATION FORM
Presenter: Preston McKee
Moderator: Ida Hoelscher (Wildlife Management)
Title: “Habitat Selection and Movement Behavior of Mule Deer Using an Integrated Step Selection Analysis in Black Gap Wildlife Management Area”
(start: 3pm)   
SESSION EVALUATION FORM
3:30-3:50   Presenter: Leanna Morin
Moderator: Dr. Ryan Luna (Wildlife Management)
Title: “Livestock Gazing Effects on Pronghorn-Preferred Forbs During the Winter in the Trans-Pecos, Texas”
(start: 3:30pm)  
SESSION EVALUATION FORM
4:00-4:20 Presenter: Kai Yun Lai
Moderator: Kathleen Rivers (Equine Science)
Title: “An Epidemiological Survey of Dental Malocclusions and Its Relationship with Nutrient Digestibility and Rideability in Working Ranch Horses in West Texas”
(start: 4pm)    SESSION EVALUATION FORM
Presenter: Kayla Waggoner
Moderator: Dr.Savannah Williamson (American History)
Title: American Christianity, the “Great War,” and Nationalistic Frenzy: The Fundamentalist Response to Victory and Crusade Against Perceived Anti-Christs
(start: 4pm)    SESSION EVALUATION FORM
4:30-4:50   Presenter: Maya Ressler
Moderator: Dr. Ryan Luna (Wildlife Management)
Title: “Correlation Among Demographic Rates and the Influence of Catastrophic Weather Events on Montezuma Quail in the Trans-Pecos of Texas”
(start: 4:30pm)    SESSION EVALUATION FORM
5:00-5:20   Extended Time: 5:00pm-5:50pm
Presenter:
Ian Craigie, Marley Rokas, Kathryn Bruce
Moderator: Dr. Jessica Velasco  (Political Science/Government)
Title: “Trends in State and Local Government Interactions”

(start: 5pm)   SESSION EVALUATION FORM
5:30-5:50 Presenter: Yaritza Corona, Isaias Gutierrez, Cristian Bernal-Sanchez
Moderator: Dr. Carolyn Barrientes (Theatre)
Title: “The Dynamics and Chemistry in the Characterization of “Jesus y La Tamalera” Bilingual Play”
(start: 5pm)    
SESSION EVALUATION FORM
5pm Session Continues

Noon – 12:50pm Symposium Spotlight Event – Welcome and Symposium Keynote Address

Noon-12:50pm / SRSU Symposium Spotlight Event
Welcome & Keynote Introduction – Dr. Bernie Canteñs
SRSU Executive Vice President & Provost

Keynote SpeakerDan Foley Ph.D.
Dr. Dan Foley is a Professor of Biology and Chair of the Department of Natural & Behavioral Sciences on the RGC campuses and Chair of Biology, Geology & Physical Sciences on the Alpine campus.

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Dan Foley profile

Keynote Bio:
Dr Dan Foley began employment with Sul Ross State University-Rio Grande College in 2003 as an Assistant Professor. Since them he has been elevated to the rank of Professor and currently serves as the Chair of the Department of Natural & Behavioral Sciences on the RGC campuses and Chair of Biology, Geology & Physical Sciences on the Alpine campus.

At Rio Grande College He is instrumental in developing and seeking approval from the Texas Coordinating Board of Higher Education to offer the necessary curriculum and degree in Bachelor’s of Science in Biology.

Dr. Foley’s research has focused on landscape level ecologies of vertebrates, particularly rare and endangered species of reptiles and fishes and gamebird species. Additionally, he has investigated the impacts of various exotic invasive vertebrate species on native ecosystems.

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1:00 – 1:20pm Session Presentations – Student Information and Abstracts

1:00-1:20pm / Virtual Room A – Moderator: Dr. Kathy Kay Stein

Presenter: Gabriela Olivas
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Kathy Kay Stein 
Title: “Where Are the Wild Things?: Controversy in Where the Wild Things Are”
Virtual Presentation: Pre-recorded video presentation with live follow-up – Undergraduate
Abstract: “During a time when society was conservative to its core, author and illustrator Maurice Sendak (1928-2012) revolutionized children’s literature with the publication of his book Where the Wild Things Are in 1963. The book was notably different from the children’s literature that preceded it, and in doing so, Sendak shone a light to uncover the ugly truths that lurk in the shadows of childhood. Despite the book’s controversy at the time of its publication, it is still read by children to this day, proving its impact and cultural influence. The debate that arose due to Sendak’s book was a result of American culture in the 1960s, in which people dared not to speak of taboo matters. Where the Wild Things Are was controversial due to its imaginative, supernatural elements, and its newfound depictions of a rebellious child. Sendak’s work has contributed greatly to children’s literature, providing children the means to travel into the landscape of their own imaginations and break free from the grip of childhood.”

PRESENTER VIDEO SESSION RECORDING


1:00-1:20pm / Virtual Room B – Moderator: Dr. Shanna Moody

Presenter:  Brandon Mayers
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Shanna Moody 
Title: “The Assessment of Lower Extremity Range of Motion in Division III Collegiate Rodeo Athletes: Comparison of Goniometry, Manual Muscle Testing, and Overhead Squat.”
Presentation: Pre-recorded video presentation with live follow-up – Undergraduate
Abstract: “Collegiate rodeo athletes are a unique group of competitors on campus. While they compete for and represent their college in competition, due to the financial nature of the sport rodeo it is not considered an NCAA sport. Therefore, these athletes do not receive training, medical attention, or other institutional support provided to traditional athletes. Additionally, there is little research or data collected on these athletes. Evidence suggests that injury pathologies to the shoulder, hip, knee, and ankle have a correlation with limited muscular flexibility and range of motion deficits based on goniometry results. The purpose of this study is to identify the relationship between lower extremity range of motion and injury by obtaining baseline joint goniometric measurements, muscular imbalance, and manual strength in division three collegiate rodeo athletes by doing manual muscle testing. This research will provide baseline data to identify limitations, to compare rodeo athletes to other sports, and to create corrective exercise programming. It is hypothesized that collegiate rodeo athletes will score below the normal range on goniometry measurements on dorsiflexion and knee extension and that the most common postural dysfunction to be knee valgus with heel rising. A secondary hypothesis is that the range of motion and dysfunction patterns will be related to non-impact injuries. The relationship of lower extremity range of motion with injuries in collegiate rodeo athletes will help bring awareness that these athletes’ bodies are potentially movement compromised and warrant support services from their university to decrease injury risk.

PRESENTER VIDEO SESSION RECORDING

 

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1:30 – 1:50pm Session Presentations – Student Information and Abstracts

1:30-1:50pm / Virtual Room A – Moderator: Dr. Sally Roche

Presenter: San Juanita Hernandez
Faculty Mentor: Dr.Sally Roche 
Title: “Entanglement is Inevitable: The Empathic Response”
Poster/Presentation: Pre-recorded video presentation with live follow-up – Undergraduate
Abstract: “Our society is inundated with the modern notion of love. That is, the idea that one’s monogamous life partner must be lover, therapist, and superhuman rolled into one person. In short, a deeply problematic romanticism saturates our culture. Workable, mature relationships are cast aside in favor of grand gestures and, when all else fails, ceasing to care. If our media reflects this, then I aimed to describe the connection between stories and marital relationships. The concept shifted from the negative to the positive, of fiction leading to health and well-being in romance. Mainly, I collected qualitative data using various journals and encyclopedias of clinical, social, personality, and developmental psychology, as well as sociology, anthropology, neuroscience, cognitive-behavioral therapy, and phylogenetic studies. Analysis indicated that the connection was traceable, as a significant feature of our biology is the ability to integrate cognition, linguistic intelligence, and emotive imagination in the didactic process. This biological feature culminates in the empathic response to the experiences of another person in stories but which cannot be observed firsthand in reality. The results indicate that stories lead to emotional maturity and empathic competence as applied throughout the developing psyche. Both are needed to experience fulfilling relationships and can be strengthened through individual and marital counselling. On this basis, a shortage of empathy in adulthood can be scaffolded (and empathy during the formative years can be cemented) with fiction and it turns out that love is a skill.

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1:30-1:50pm / Virtual Room B – Moderator: Dr. Carolyn Barrientes

Presenter: Teresa Quintana
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Carolyn Barrientes 
Title: “Interior Design with a Purpose”
Poster/Presentation: Pre-recorded video presentation with live follow-up – Undergraduate
Abstract: “Today I will be presenting two pieces of my work. The first piece is a 3-D model of my design of a music room as requested by a “pretend client.” The purpose of this project was to reach the desired wants and needs of the client, and to transform their original living space into a music room with three additional requirements: a piano, the client’s neo-expressionism art, and a couch. The goal of this project was to create this 3-D model using a ¼” = 1’0” scale while reaching the requirements, along with a secondary floor that holds the attic. The reason I chose this project to present was because I’d like to show how I spent loads of time paying attention to the details in order to perfectly put this model together.
The second piece I am presenting is the Bird Street floor plans I designed myself. In this project, I got to work with a real-life client who allowed my fellow classmates and I to explore their home and accompany them into re-designing their living space and master bedroom-bathroom. It was an awesome experience getting to work with real clients because I was able to learn the reality of dealing with the ups and downs of a client. In this project, we were required to remodel the living space and master bedroom-bathroom to make it ADA-approved. This means we had to do our research with ADA-approved designs, along with certain measurements that are required to be approved. In the making of this project, I was tested and challenged. An example can include coming up with certain designs for the living spaces but being turned down because it wasn’t what the client originally wanted. Nonetheless, my successes and failures kept me motivated to reach the client’s wants and needs. The floor plans I came up with on the project are my final selected designs and recommendations I made to the clients. Although we never got to make it to the building stages with the client, it was a great introduction to working with clients that I will most likely see in my future career.

PRESENTER VIDEO SESSION RECORDING

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2:00 – 2:20pm Session Presentations – Student Information and Abstracts

2:00-2:20pm / Virtual Room A – Moderator: Dr. Chris Herrera

Presenter: Emily Jillson
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Chris Herrera 
Title: “Effects of Pre-Workout Supplementation on Muscular Strength, Muscular endurance and Self-Rated Performance in College Age Women during Menstruation”
Poster/Presentation: Pre-recorded video presentation with live follow-up – Undergraduate
Abstract: “Almost all female athletes report menstrual cycle-related symptoms, and 67% of them consider these symptoms as significant performance impairments (Findlay et al., 2020). Recent studies have demonstrated the use of multi-ingredient pre-workout supplementation (MIPS) prior to exercise improves energy, focus and performance in both upper and lower body resistance exercises. Although some benefits have been found, there appears to be a placebo effect, and the effect in women, especially during menstruation is greatly unknown. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to determine the effects of MIPS, if any, on resistance training exercises in women during menstruation. The study will test the effects of caffeinated-MIPS vs placebo on a resistance training protocol consisting of max bench press and back squat (1RM), followed by a repetition to failure (RTF) at 50% max in thirty college female athletes. Self-rated energy, focus and performance will be compared between conditions using a 10 cm visual analogue scale. The study will follow a randomized control group, pretest-posttest design. It is hypothesized that the caffeinated pre-workout supplement taken 30min prior to resistance training exercise will elicit a greater improvement in 1RM and RTF as well improve self-rated energy, focus and performance. The potential findings of this study would benefit women that regularly exercise or train for sports during menstruation.

PRESENTER VIDEO SESSION RECORDING

2:00-2:20pm / Virtual Room B – Moderator: Ida Hoelscher

Presenter: Olivia Gray
Faculty Mentor: Dr.Justin French 
Title: “Temporal Resource Partitioning of Aoudad, Desert Bighorn Sheep, and Mule Deer in the Trans-Pecos Region, Texas”
Poster/Presentation: Pre-recorded video presentation with live follow-up – Graduate
Abstract: “Desert bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis), mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), and exotic aoudad (Ammotragus lervia) inhabit the mountainous regions of the Trans Pecos. Biologists are concerned of resource competition in co-occupied landscapes, specifically between non-native aoudad and Texas’ native ungulates. Arid regions like the Chihuahuan Desert receive little, highly seasonal rainfall, limiting the availability of water and vegetation resources. Ungulates use resources differently depending on seasonal activities (rutting, breeding, lambing, etc.). Limited resources, paired with cycles of ungulate use, may indicate temporal partitioning of resources among these three ungulate species. By examining these cycles through time, we will determine changes in resource importance and how ungulates may partition their use. Texas Parks and Wildlife Department deployed collars on forty-five desert bighorn sheep (twenty-one male, twenty-four female), fifty-nine mule deer (thirty-four male, twenty-five female), and forty-one aoudad (thirty-three male, eight female) in the Van Horn Mountains from 2019 to 2020. We utilized data from these collars to inspect cyclic patterns in resource use of each species through time using autocorrelation surfaces. We examined cycles in distance to known water sources, percent shrub cover, ruggedness, and escape terrain. Preliminary results show daily cycles in use of rugged terrain in all ungulate species, with a seasonal shift during spring months in mule deer and aoudad. Preliminary results suggest that ungulate use of key habitats varies on daily and seasonal scales, providing opportunity for temporal niche partitioning.”

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2:30 – 2:50pm Session Presentations – Student Information and Abstracts

2:30-2:50pm / Virtual Room A – Moderator: Dr. Carlos Gonzalez

Presenter: Erin O’Connell
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Justin French 
Title: “Modeling Pronghorn Behavior and Space-Use: Acclimation of Translocated Pronghorn in the Edwards Plateau”
Poster/Presentation: Pre-recorded video presentation with live follow-up – Graduate
Abstract: “Translocation is the most widely used tool to combat megafauna population declines to prevent extinction. However, despite widespread use, there are no explicit measures for translocation success. To alleviate this challenge, it is first essential to define appropriate timescales to assess translocation success. We estimated the post-translocation acclimation period for translocated pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) based on patterns of animal space use. We postulated that residents would maintain stable ranges, whereas translocated pronghorn would initially have large range sizes that declined as they acclimated. In February 2019, Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD) collared twenty resident pronghorn on Rocker b Ranch, near Big Lake, Texas. In January 2020, TPWD translocated 115 pronghorn from Pampa, Texas, to the Rocker b Ranch, forty-five of which were fitted with GPS collars. We fit weekly utilization distributions (UD) for each pronghorn following the translocation event. We took the area of the seventy-five percent isopleth of each UD to collate a time series of each individual’s weekly range size. We then fit generalized linear mixed models to quantify differences between resident and translocated pronghorn behavior. The acclimation period for translocated pronghorn was approximately six months. Translocated pronghorn settled into smaller ranges than residents, suggesting memory drives pronghorn space use and naivety to barriers benefits translocated individuals. Success of both fence modification efforts and translocations should be evaluated over longer time scales than previously thought. Further, translocation may expedite the colonization of reconnected habitat following fence modification, conferring a previously unrecognized advantage of this practice.

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2:30-2:50pm / Virtual Room B – Moderator: Ida Hoelscher

Presenter: Emily Card
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Justin French 
Title: “Impacts of Woody Plant Removal on Wintering Grassland Bird Communities and Habitat Characteristics in the Marfa Grasslands, Texas”
Poster/Presentation: Pre-recorded video presentation with live follow-up – Graduate
Abstract: “Grassland birds are one of the most imperiled avian groups in North America, having declined consistently and at higher rates than any other group of birds in the continent over the past seventy years. This loss is primarily attributed to the disappearance of suitable habitat, both on the breeding and wintering grounds. Approximately ninety percent of migratory grassland bird species that breed on North America’s Great Plains spend the winter in the Chihuahuan Desert. However, the encroachment of woody plants into grasslands degrades and changes suitable habitat into desert shrublands, contributing to the decline of grassland bird populations. To evaluate how grassland birds respond to habitat restoration efforts, I conducted grassland bird and vegetation surveys on a ranch in the Marfa grasslands of West Texas. In the summer of 2019, approximately 1,619 ha of this private property was treated with an aerial herbicide spray. The ranch was divided into three stratum types (i.e., grassland, untreated, and herbicide-treated) and bird and vegetation surveys were conducted within each stratum during the winters of 2019-2021. The objectives of this research were to 1) evaluate how woody plant removal efforts influence wintering bird community composition in herbicide-treated plots, and 2) assess changes in shrub cover, shrub height, and grass cover across the sampling period in herbicide-treated plots. Together, this information will help us understand if using herbicide to remove woody plants is an effective way to restore grassland ecosystems and threatened grassland bird groups in the Chihuahuan Desert.

PRESENTER VIDEO SESSION RECORDING

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3:00 – 3:20pm Session Presentations – Student Information and Abstracts

3:00-3:20pm / Virtual Room A – Moderator: Dr.Carolyn Barrientes

Presenter: Melissa Urness
Faculty Mentor: Dr.Carolyn Barrientes 
Title: “Period Research into 1930’s English Interiors for Theatre Scenic Design”
Poster/Presentation: Pre-recorded video presentation with live follow-up – Undergraduate
Abstract: “This project consists of visual research, drafting, color rendering, mood board, color model, and a research paper. The project I will be presenting stems from Introduction to Theatrical Design course, which surveys the elements of architectural design for the purpose of creating scenery for a a theatrical production. We learned about the art of design and the elements of visual compositions that go hand-in-hand when sets are produced for shows. In this class, I created a 3-D set model for the production of Noël Coward’s “Blithe Spirit,” consisting of research from 1930’s England.

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3:00-3:20pm / Virtual Room B – Moderator: Ida Hoelscher

Presenter: Preston McKee
Faculty Mentor: Dr.Justin French 
Title: “Habitat Selection and Movement Behavior of Mule Deer Using an Integrated Step Selection Analysis in Black Gap Wildlife Management Area”
Poster/Presentation: Pre-recorded video presentation with live follow-up – Graduate
Abstract: “Mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) populations have declined due to habitat loss or fragmentation. Little is known about the habitat needs of mule deer in the extreme arid environments of their range. The goal of this project is to look at how habitat selection changes for mule deer in more extreme environments. Understanding this will allow managers to adapt practices to these extreme environments. Texas Parks and Wildlife Department translocated eight female mule deer, ranging from 1.5 to 8.5 years of age, from Elephant Mountain Wildlife Management Area to Black Gap Wildlife Management Area (BGWMA) as a population reduction effort. The translocated mule deer were fitted with GPS collars programmed to collect a location every three hours. We used an Integrated Step Selection Analysis (ISSA) to examine the effects of habitat conditions on both movement and habitat selection, including slope, aspect, ruggedness, and elevation. Mule deer selected for habitat that was higher in elevation and selected against rugged terrain. Movement rates were lower in rugged terrain. These results suggest that mule deer may prefer higher elevation to avoid extreme heat. Also, mule deer may avoid rugged terrain because it is harder to search for food and more difficult to avoid predators in these areas.

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3:30 – 3:50pm Session Presentations – Student Information and Abstracts

3:30-3:50pm / Virtual Room A – Moderator: Dr. Ryan Luna

Presenter: Leanna Morin
Faculty Mentor: Dr.Justin French 
Title: “Livestock Grazing Effects on Pronghorn-Preferred Forbs During the Winter in the Trans-Pecos, Texas”
Poster/Presentation: Pre-recorded video presentation with live follow-up – Graduate
Abstract: “Pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) is a native North American ungulate found in semi-arid landscapes. In the Trans-Pecos region of Texas, populations declined to less than 3,000 in 2012 due to drought, disease, habitat degradation, and fragmentation. Since 2011, translocations and habitat improvements are being implemented to mitigate pronghorn loss. As part of these efforts, cattle grazing may be manipulated to further improve pronghorn habitat. However, the effects of grazing on winter forage conditions are not well understood. The objectives of this study are to compare vegetation production, species diversity, and nutritional quality in 3 cattle grazing systems during the cool season. This project was conducted on the Mimms Ranch in Presidio County, Texas. I sampled 100 plots in a continuously grazed system, 150 plots in a rotationally grazed system, and five plots within each of ten non-grazed pastures under otherwise similar conditions on the same ranch. I identified and collected all above ground biomass of all non-woody forbs within a 1 m2 at each sampling point. I measured the acid detergent fiber (ADF), total digestible nutrients (TDN), and crude protein of winter 2021 vegetation samples. I ran a redundancy analysis to investigate the relationships between grazing systems and forb biomass, diversity, protein, and energy contents. Understanding vegetation community response to livestock grazing systems may allow managers to adapt grazing practices to maximize the abundance and quality of winter forage for pronghorn.

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4:00 – 4:20pm Session Presentations – Student Information and Abstracts

4:00-4:20pm / Virtual Room A – Moderator: Kathleen Rivers

Presenter: Kai Yun Lai
Faculty Mentor: Dr.Jamie Boyd 
Title: “An Epidemiological Survey of Dental Malocclusions and Its Relationship with Nutrient Digestibility and Rideability in Working Ranch Horses in West Texas”
Poster/Presentation: Pre-recorded video presentation with live follow-up – Graduate
Abstract: “Dental malocclusion can lead to some of the most serious detrimental issues, such as pain, malnutrition, and colic in horses (Anthony et al., 2010). Moreover, the behavior, rideability, and range of motion of the equine head (Neto et al., 2018) are impacted by poor dentition (Moine et al., 2017; Kjærulff and Lindegaard, 2020). Unfortunately, only two research publications exist on dental pathology in horses, specifically focused on rodeo horses (Guerra et al., 2010; Guerra et al., 2016). They were conducted by the same group of researchers in Chile from 2010-2013. Thus, neither fundamental nor recent research on the epidemiology of dental malocclusions in Western horses has been published in the USA. Without baseline survey research, it is hard to evaluate the overall management practices and equine health care. Nutrition management of rodeo horses is also not well published. Nevertheless, dental care has a direct impact on nutrient digestibility, mainly in feed intake, fecal fiber length, apparent digestibility in crude protein and crude fiber (Carmalt et al., 2003; Carmalt et al., 2008; Ralston et al., 2010; Zwirglmaier et al., 2011; Araújo et al., 2018; Johnson et al., 2017; Starrett et al., 2021). Therefore, investigating the prevalence of equine dental malocclusions and its relationship with essential parameters (nutrition and athletic performances) is crucial to establishing equine welfare and health in the rodeo industry.”

PRESENTER VIDEO SESSION RECORDING


4:00-4:20pm / Virtual Room B – Moderator: Dr. Savannah Williamson

Presenter: Kayla Waggoner
Faculty Mentor: Dr.Savannah Williamson 
Title: “American Christianity, the “Great War,” and Nationalistic Frenzy: The Fundamentalist Response to Victory and Crusade Against Perceived Anti-Christs”
Presentation: Pre-recorded video presentation with live follow-up – Graduate
Abstract: “The United States’ entrance into the “Great War” was met with both support and opposition domestically. Within the evangelical Christian community existed the emergence of a fundamentalist movement that saw the same internal struggle between militant patriotism and Christian pacifism. Fundamentalist preachers such as Billy Sunday equated patriotic Americanism with Christianity, opposite traitors, and German philosophical “culture.” The nationalistic frenzy of American Exceptionalism, reinvigorated by the Allied victory in 1918 engendered a unified fundamentalist mission of purity and patriotism. The enhanced American economic and global standing, as well as the notion of a War being fought against perceived anti-Christs, steered many fundamentalists towards militant and vigilante justice as a way of sustaining the win garnered for the Country as symbolized by Uncle Sam. Fighting against political, cultural, and societal impurities, fundamentalists sought to preserve Americanism and Christian values. Fundamentalist groups would ultimately funnel these religious, patriotic, and nationalist ideologies into the reinvigorated Ku Klux Klan.

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4:30 – 4:50pm Session Presentations – Student Information and Abstracts

4:30-4:50pm / Virtual Room B – Moderator: Dr. Ryan Luna

Presenter: Maya Ressler
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Ryan Luna (Wildlife Management)
Title: “Correlation Among Demographic Rates and the Influence of Catastrophic Weather Events on Montezuma Quail in the Trans-Pecos of Texas”  
Poster/Presentation: Pre-recorded video presentation with live follow-up – Graduate
Abstract: “Montezuma quail (Cyrtonyx montezumae) are a cryptic species inhabiting the pinon-juniper woodlands of the southwestern United States and much of Mexico. Little is known about Montezuma quail population demography and life history, but precipitation and its timing are likely key factors driving Montezuma quail reproduction. In the Trans-Pecos region of Texas, this species is potentially vulnerable to environmental catastrophes, such as the extreme winter events experienced in early 2021, but the implications of such events on their demography are not known. Winter events are known to contribute to over-winter mortality in other quail species, such as northern bobwhites (Colinus virginianus), but these concepts have yet been extended to evaluate Montezuma quail winter mortalities. Recent work suggests that such events may induce tail-specific correlation structures among demographic rates, though most models treat them as independent. Neglecting such correlations may lead to grossly erroneous predictions of population outcomes. We created a stochastic 3-stage Lefkovich matrix population model (MPM) to examine the effects of population parameter correlations on predicted population outcomes, local abundances, and extinction probability of Montezuma quail populations. We found that stabilizing dynamics were possible when demographic rates were independent, but destabilizing dynamics, which may lead to local extirpations, when tail specific correlations were considered. This suggests extreme weather events prevent stage-related rescue effects and may destabilize Montezuma quail populations.”

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5:00 – 5:20pm Session Presentations – Student Information and Abstracts

5:00-5:20pm / Virtual Room B – Moderator: Dr. Jessica Velasco

Presenter: Ian Craigie, Marley Rokas, Kathryn Bruce 
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jessica Velasco 
Title: “Trends in State & Local Government Interactions’”
Presentation: Live student group or panel virtual event – 50 min session max virtual event  – Undergraduate
Abstract: “This panel will highlight several of the current trends in state and local government interactions. Topics may include preemption, municipal takeovers, home rule differences among states, and other activities that promote both conflict and cooperation among state and local governments.

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5:30 – 5:50pm Session Presentations – Student Information and Abstracts

5:30-5:50pm / Virtual Room A – Moderator: Dr. Carolyn Barrientes

Presenter: Yaritza Corona, Isaias Gutierrez, Cristian Bernal-Sanchez 
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Carolyn Barrientes 
Title: “The Dynamics and Chemistry in the Characterization of The Bilingual play “Jesus y La Tamalera””
Presentation: Pre-recorded video presentation with live follow-up  – Undergraduate
Abstract: “As a team of students that were involved in the staged reading of the bilingual play “Jesus y La Tamalera” during Fall, 2021, we wish to present three characters: Estella, a law student; Tito, the youngest Rosales brother and a founder of La Perlita Art Gallery; and his middle brother Nacho, also a founder of the Art Gallery in Escondido, Iowa. As we present a scene or two from this newly written bilingual play, we are introducing the dynamics and chemistry of three characters. These three individuals communicate the language of the Mexican-American culture and share the stories of family, art, love, music, and theatre along the way. As a Hispanic serving institution, we bilingual theatre students at SRSU are honored to share this creative project with the Sul Ross and extended community via the undergraduate symposium opportunity.

PRESENTER VIDEO SESSION RECORDING

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