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Department of Natural and Social Sciences Courses


BIO 3300   Basic Survey of Science   A general science course designed for elementary education majors, focusing on understanding and teaching Physics and Chemistry standards, from Kindergarten level through Middle School. Standards will be presented using the scientific inquiry cycle of observing a phenomenon, asking questions, constructing explanations, planning and carrying out investigations, and engaging in argument from evidence.  
BIO 3302   Evolution   BIO 3302 Evolution (3-0). Evolution is the central concept in biology. This course examines evolution as a science and places it in an historical context. Lectures focus on descent with modification, the nature of natural selection, the history of the earth, the information content of the fossil record, and processes responsible for diversification (speciation and extinction). Prerequisites: BIOL 3306 or BIO 3306  
BIO 3303   Sciences in Cinema and Telev   BIO 3303 Sciences in Cinema and Television (3-0). A lecture course examining the scientific content or lack thereof in classic and current films. Films with a scientific theme will be viewed and the merits of the scientific content will be discussed. Students will gain an understanding and appreciation of how science is portrayed to the viewing public by the film and television industries and can be used as a persuasive tool for political maneuvering. Equivalent courses: BIOL 3303.  
BIO 3306   Genetics   BIO 3306 Genetics (3-0). A comprehensive introduction to the four main areas of modern genetics: Mendelian genetics, cytogenetics, molecular genetics, and population genetics. The historical and philosophical basis for these areas will be dealt with using plant and animal studies. Prerequisites: BIOL 1306/1106 & BIOL 1307/1107  
BIO 3307   Animal Behavior   Animal Behavior (3-0). The study of feeding, defense, animal orientation, instinctive behavior, learning, communication, social, and sexual behavior with emphasis on evolutionary and ecological relationships. Prerequisites: BIOL 1306/1106 & BIOL 1307/1107  
BIO 3309   Found Elem Sci II   BIO 3309 Foundations of Elementary Science II (3-0). Second course in a series of two in required science content sequence for preservice elementary and middle school teachers. Topics covered will include the following TEA science competencies: Lab Processes Equipment && Safety; Students as Learners && Science Instruction; Science Assessment; Adaptions * Evolution; Organisms && the Environment; Structure && Function of Earth Systems; Cycles in Earth Systems; Energy in Weather && Climate; Solar System && the Universe. Emphasis on problem-solving as a pedagogical tool with integration of manipulative-based explorations. For elementary education majors only. Offered spring.  
BIO 3403   Parasitology   BIO 3403 Parasitology (3-2). A study of the biology morphology and ecology of parasitic organisms as they relate to various host- parasite relationships and diseases in animals and man. The diagnosis pathology treatment and prevention of parasitism will be discussed. Post mortem examinations and treatment of animals will be performed in labs as available. Prerequisite: BIOL 1307 - Biology for Majors II. Equivalent course: BIOL 3403. Lab fee: $12  
BIO 3403   Parasitology - Laboratory   BIO 3403 Parasitology (3-2). A study of the biology morphology and ecology of parasitic organisms as they relate to various host- parasite relationships and diseases in animals and man. The diagnosis pathology treatment and prevention of parasitism will be discussed. Post mortem examinations and treatment of animals will be performed in labs as available. Prerequisite: BIOL 1307 - Biology for Majors II. Equivalent course: BIOL 3403. Lab fee: $12  
BIO 3406   Principles of Ecology   BIO 3406 Principles of Ecology (3-2). A study of the interrelationships of plants and animals and their environments, addressing where and how organisms live. To include, but not limited to: population growth, ecosystem function, energy flow, nutrient cycling, ecological classification, biodiversity, species interactions, adaptation, sampling and censusing techniques. Prerequisites: BIOL 1306/1106 & BIOL 1307/1107.  
BIO 3407   Vertebrate Natural Hist - Lab   BIO 3407 Vertebrate Natural History (3-2). Taxonomy, evolution, and natural history of vertebrates of the world with emphasis on North American and Texas species. Prerequisite: BIOL 1407. Equivalent courses: BIOL 3407  
BIO 3407   Vertebrate Natural History   BIO 3407 Vertebrate Natural History (3-2). Taxonomy, evolution, and natural history of vertebrates of the world with emphasis on North American and Texas species. Prerequisite: BIOL 1407. Equivalent courses: BIOL 3407  
BIO 4101   Biology Senior Review   BIO 4101 Biology Senior Review (1-0). The purpose of the senior capstone is to provide students with a formal opportunity to apply the knowledge and skills acquired in the Biology curriculum to a culminating personalized learning experience. Students conduct a thorough literature review of pertinent topics in biology, analyze and summarize findings, resulting in a written and/or oral report. Required for all Biology majors. To be taken during the final long semester before graduation. Prerequisite: Completion of, or current enrollment in, all required departmental courses (e.g., Genetics and Cell Biology).  
BIO 4301   Cell Biology   4301 Cell Biology (3-0). A study of the particulate morphology and basic physiology of the cell and cell organelles, including basic facts, concepts, and problems in modern cellular biology. Prerequisite: BIOL 1306/1106 & BIOL 1307/1107.  
BIO 4305   ST: Human Nutrition   BIO 4305 Special Topics (3-0). A course dealing with selected and timely topics in biology such as animal behavior, animal physiology, coevolution, invasive species, aquatic plants, conservation or many other potential subjects. May be repeated when topic varies. Prerequisite: BIOL 1306/1106 & BIOL 1307/1107. Equivalent courses: BIOL 4305  
BIO 4403   Herpetology   BIO 4403 Herpetology (3-2). An exploration into the ecology, natural history, physiology, evolution and systematics of amphibians and reptiles with emphasis on those species found in the southwestern region of Texas. Prerequisites: BIOL 1306/1106 & BIOL 1307/1107.  
BIO 4403   Herpetology - Laboratory   BIO 4403 Herpetology (3-2). An exploration into the ecology, natural history, physiology, evolution and systematics of amphibians and reptiles with emphasis on those species found in the southwestern region of Texas. Prerequisites: BIOL 1306/1106 & BIOL 1307/1107.  
BIO 4409   Mammalogy   BIO 4409 Mammalogy (3-2). An exploration into the ecology, natural history, physiology, evolution, systematics, and economic relations of mammals with emphasis on those species found in the southwestern region of Texas. Museum technique and field work will be stressed. Prerequisites: BIOL 1306/1106 & BIOL 1307/1107.  
BIO 4409   Mammalogy Lab   BIO 4409 Mammalogy (3-2). An exploration into the ecology, natural history, physiology, evolution, systematics, and economic relations of mammals with emphasis on those species found in the southwestern region of Texas. Museum technique and field work will be stressed. Prerequisites: BIOL 1306/1106 & BIOL 1307/1107.  
BIO 4410   Med & Veterinary Entomology   BIO 4410 Medical and Veterinary Entomology (3-2). A comprehensive introduction to the insects and other arthropods of medical and veterinary importance. Lectures emphasize life-cycles, transmission of disease, and control practices. Laboratory studies emphasize taxonomy and techniques. Prerequisite: BIOL 1307 - Biology for Majors II Lab fee: $8. Equivalent courses: BIOL 4410  
CRIM 3300   History Of Crim Jus    
CRIM 3300   History Of Crim Jus   CRIM 3300 History of Criminal Justice (3-0). A survey of criminal justice history; a study relating to the developments in American law, police practice and penology in Western civilization. Major American and European theories of criminal justice are studied. Equivalent courses: CJ 3300  
CRIM 3302   Victimology    
CRIM 3302   Victimology   CRIM 3302 Victimology (3-0). Provides an in-depth study of factors that affect victims of crime. Specific crimes are studied and remedies explored; victim precipitation, self-help and prevention of victimization, victimization surveys and other data sources; history of victims' rights and the victims' rights movement and victim services. Equivalent courses: SOC 3302 (through Summer 2020), CJ 3302  
CRIM 3305   Substantive Law    
CRIM 3305   Substantive Law   CRIM 3305 Substantive Law (3-0). A study of the philosophical foundations of American law; a survey of applied criminal law with an emphasis on the most common criminal offenses; an examination of the Texas Penal Code. Equivalent courses: CJ 3305  
CRIM 3306   Community Corrections   CRIM 3306 Community Corrections (3-0). This course will focus on community corrections in the criminal justice system as an alternative to institutionalization. Students will examine the treatment and rehabilitation concepts; probation and parole techniques; statutory and case law; case management; agency organization and administration.  
CRIM 3307   Organized Crime    
CRIM 3308   Law Of Evidence    
CRIM 3308   Law Of Evidence   CRIM 3308 Law of Evidence (3-0). An examination of the rules of evidence and the procedures for obtaining it with special emphasis on application in criminal court. Equivalent courses: CJ 3308  
CRIM 3312   Criminal Investigation   CRIM 3312 Criminal Investigation (3-0). Investigative theory; collection and preservation of evidence; sources of information; interview and interrogation; uses of forensic sciences; case and trial preparation photography.  
CRIM 3316   Domestic Violence   CRIM 3316 Domestic Violence (3-0). This course is designed to give the student a basic knowledge of the issues surrounding victims and perpetrators of domestic violence. Topics covered will include victim and perpetrator characteristics explanations for the violence and explanations for the victim's behavior. Criminal justice responses to domestic violence situations both currently and historically will also be covered.  
CRIM 3317   White Collar Crime   CRIM 3317 White Collar Crime (3-0). This course is deigned to familiarize the student with the special crimes that qualify as white collar crime. By the end of the course the student will be able to distinguish white collar offenses from other types of crimes. Additionally, students will be familiar with the criminal justice system?s contemporary responses to white collar crimes. Equivalent courses: CJ 3317  
CRIM 3320   Emergency Management   CRIM 3320 Emergency Management (3-0). This course covers risk management and disaster management theory, risk assessment, protection of critical infrastructure, Incident Command Systems, FEMA strategies, and other efforts to prevent and mitigate terrorist attacks, natural disasters, and other large scale events. The role of all levels of government, military, and citizenry will be examined. Equivalent courses: CJ 3320  
CRIM 3340   Criminal Justice Ethics   CRIM 3340 Criminal Justice Ethics (3-0). An Analysis of ethical dilemmas in the criminal justice system. An exploration into situational ethics relating to practices in Criminal Justice system. This course will address many ethical scenarios encountered by law enforcement prosecutors court officers and corrections staff in the performance of their duties. Students will develop an understanding of the moral and ethical issues as well as how these dilemmas are resolved.  
CRIM 3341   Research Methods for CJ   CRIM 3341 Research Methods for Criminal Justice (3-1). This course provides as introduction to criminal justice research methods. Students will learn how to evaluate current and conduct contemporary research in the field of criminal justice. The course introduces students to terminology and tools of the scientific method. Several data collection techniques available to criminal justice researchers are explored and evaluated Students will learn how to evaluate academic research products in terns if their contribution to the fields of criminal justice as well as to how to develop their own research problems. (Required for CJ and HS)  
CRIM 3362   Adv Cyber Investigations   CRIM 3362 Advanced Cybercrime Investigations (3-0). This course examines advanced investigation techniques in cybercrime cases, including internet frauds and schemes, issues in ecommerce, and threats to the national infrastructure. Cyber security policies, legal issues, and advanced investigative strategies, as well as the implications of investigations on a national and global scale will also be evaluated. Prerequisites: CJ 1301 or CJ 1302 and CJ 2362. Equivalent courses: CJ 3362  
CRIM 3370   Law And Society   CRIM 3370 Law & Society (3-0). An analysis of the American criminal justice system; an overview of the history, philosophy, and contemporary functions of the separate institutions which contribute to the process; the police, courts, corrections, and juvenile justice systems will be examined for their contributions, assumptions, and interrelations. Equivalent courses CJ 3370; CRIM 3304 (though summer 2023).  
CRIM 3371   Women and Crime   CRIM 3371 Women and Crime (3-0). This course is designed to give the student a basic knowledge of the issues surrounding women and their interaction with the criminal justice system. Topics covered will include women as victims of crime, as perpetrators of crime, and as workers within the system. Equivalent courses: CRIM 3311, CJ 3311 (through Summer 2023).  
CRIM 4300   Amer Corrections    
CRIM 4302   Constitutional Law    
CRIM 4303   Death Penalty   CRIM 4303 Death Penalty (3-0). This class is designed to examine the moral, legal, social and political aspects surrounding the death penalty issues. We will focus on the history of capital punishment both domestic and abroad. Issues of deterrence as well as how problems of discrimination are actively addressed. This course will utilize past legal and criminological research to argue both for and against the death penalty in America. This course is not designed to reinforce a student's current belief-rather to challenge and broaden their understanding of a complicated and divisive criminal/political issue. Equivalent courses: CJ 4303  
CRIM 4304   Criminology    
CRIM 4305   Procedural Law   CRIM 4305 Procedural Law (3-0). A study of criminal procedure and the procedural rules for the judicial enforcement of criminal law; a survey of due process; and an examination of the Texas Code of Criminal Procedure. Equivalent courses: CJ 4305  
CRIM 4309   Seminar In CJ    
CRIM 4309   Seminar In CJ: Current Issues    
CRIM 4312   Punishment   CRIM 4312 Punishment (3-0). In this course, we will review the public policy concerning the death penalty and punishment. We will further look into issues that may or may not affect the use of the death penalty within the various states. Equivalent courses: CJ 4312  
CRIM 4313   Juvenile Delinquency and Law   CRIM 4313 Juvenile Delinquency and Law (3-0). This course will focus on the nature and extent of juvenile deviant behavior; deviancy theories; juvenile statutory and case law; judicial processes; policies and police practices related to juvenile justice.  
CRIM 4314   American Courts   CRIM 4314 American Courts (3-0). A survey of the dynamics of the state and federal judicial system; the interrelated relationship of the judge, jury, prosecutor, and defense; judicial theory, and an in-depth study of the criminal case within the court.  
CRIM 4315   Serial Killers   CRIM 4315 Serial Killers (3-0). This class examines Serial Killers worldwide. Students will be exposed to numerous highly publicized Serial Killers, as well as many that are not so well known. This class will examine the root causes of these criminals and their impact on society. Equivalent courses: CJ 4315  
CRIM 4318   Advanced Homeland Security   CRIM 4318 Advanced Homeland Security (3-0). This course will explore the creation and evolution of the Department of Homeland Security. Additional focus will be on the War on Terror, Weapons of Mass Destruction, new technologies and the role of civilian organizations within Homeland Security. Equivalent courses: CJ 4318  
CRIM 4319   School Violence   CRIM 4319 School Violence (3-0). This class is designed to familiarize students with the sociological and legal issues concerning violence in schools. The subject is not limited to the United States. Equivalent courses: CJ 4319  
CRIM 4323   Transnational Crime   CRIM 4323 Transnational Crime (3-0). This course is designed to introduce the student to the study of criminal organizations and their crimes on the global stage. Focus is particularly on those organizations and crimes that cross international boundaries. Areas of study include organized crime, trafficking in drugs, humans and weapons, piracy, and other crime groups and individual criminals. Global efforts and prevention, interdiction and punishment will also be covered. A particular focus will be on placing these issues in the context of Homeland Security and the war on terror. Equivalent courses: CJ 4323  
CRIM 4324   Immigration Law and Policy   CRIM 4324 Immigration Law and Policy (3-0). This course will focus on the history and development of immigration patterns and policies in the United States. Emphasis will be placed on policy issues as related to the work of Criminal Justice practitioners particularly in the post-9/11 world. Students will also be expected to analyze policy impact on various groups of immigrants.  
CRIM 4330   Law Enforcement Admin   CRIM 4330 Law Enforcement Administration (3-0). Students will explore a comprehensive overview of practices within law enforcement administration. The history of law enforcement administration the evolution of professional policing as well as current issues and trends will be addressed. Emphasis will be places on issues related to human resource administration and the leadership skills required to successfully manage a law enforcement agency.  
CRIM 4331   Legal Issues in CJ   CRIM 4331 Legal Issues in Criminal Justice (3-0). This course will be an advanced study of the various constitutional and other legal issues within all areas of criminal justice. Specific focus will be given to Texas laws, and US Supreme Court decisions affecting law enforcement or corrections. Prerequisite: CJ 1301 of CJ 1302. (Required for HS). Equivalent courses: CJ 4331  
CRIM 4332   Const Issues in Corr   CRIM 4332 Constitutional Issues in Corrections (3-0). In the course students will explore the origins of correctional systems and how these systems and correctional philosophies have evolved over time. Students will also study the First Fourth Fifth Sixth Eighth and Fourteenth Amendment rights and the theories behind those rights as they relate to convicted prisoners and pretrial detainees. The impact of court decisions on prisons and jails. Liability and immunity of correctional personnel.  
CRIM 4335   Drug Ident & Enforcement   CRIM 4335 Drug Identification and Enforcement (3-0). Lectures demonstrations and discussions that address all aspects of drug law identification and analysis with an emphasis on those related to law enforcement. Illicit drugs are examined for their societal impact.  
CRIM 4336   Prison Gangs   CRIM 4336 Prison Gangs (3-0). This course will focus on prison gangs, their origins and their evolution and growth within the prison system. The course will examine present-day prison gang activity in and out of the prison system and the impact of prison gangs on crime and the criminal justice system in the ?free world.? By the end of the course, students will be able to understand and identify various prison gangs and have a detailed insight on the games criminals play. Equivalent courses: CJ 4336  
CRIM 4337   Forensic Science   CRIM 4337 Forensic Science (3-0). The science of fingerprints and DNA is examined; a study of criminalistics and the techniques employed in the recovery classification and identification of crime scene evidence; the analysis and interpretation of physical evidence.  
CRIM 4350   Independent Study   CRIM 4350 Independent Study (3-0). The student will pursue an independent research or experiential learning project chosen by the student in consultation and approval of the instructor. Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor. Equivalent courses: CJ 4350  
CRIM 4350   Independent Study CJ Ethics   CRIM 4350 Independent Study (3-0). The student will pursue an independent research or experiential learning project chosen by the student in consultation and approval of the instructor. Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor. Equivalent courses: CJ 4350  
CRIM 4350   Independent Study Criminal Inv   CRIM 4350 Independent Study (3-0). The student will pursue an independent research or experiential learning project chosen by the student in consultation and approval of the instructor. Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor. Equivalent courses: CJ 4350  
CRIM 4363   Intro Criminal Profiling   CRIM 4363 Introduction of Criminal Profiling (3-0). Students will explore the fundamental profiling. Discussions will include the definition of profiling, analysis of both the psychological basis and practical applications of criminal profiling, its uses, and historical applications in theory and practice. Students will explore the relationship between profiling and its application in crime and crime scene analysis, forensic science, and geographic profiling. Overview of applicable behavior-based criminal theories will be included. Prerequisite: CJ 130 or CJ 1302. Equivalent courses: CJ 4363  
CRIM 4365   Cyber Warfare   CRIM 4365 Cyber Warfare (3-0). This course is an overview of cyber warfare including discussions on its strategy and impacts. Students will evaluate the use of cyber warfare by the military, terrorist, and criminal organizations. Students will examine computer network benefits and vulnerabilities, potential weaponry, and risk mitigation. Prerequisite: CJ 1301 or CJ 1302 and CJ 2360. Equivalent courses: CJ 4365  
CRIM 4368   Multiculturalism in CJ   CRIM 4368 Multiculturalism in the Criminal Justice System (3-0). Understanding communicating and working with persons from different cultures; basic human relations skills needed by those working in the criminal justice system; women in the criminal justice system; equal protection of the law and anti-discrimination civil rights sexual harassment and related laws; criminal justice ethics.  
CRIM 4371   Procedural Law   CRIM 4371 Procedural Law (3-0). A study of criminal procedure and the procedural rules for the judicial enforcement of criminal law; a survey of due process; and an examination of the Texas Code of Criminal Procedure. Equivalent courses: CJ 4371; CRIM 4305 (through summer 2023).  
CRIM 4375   Sexual Predators   CRIM 4375 Sexual Predators (3-0). This course examines the roots, structures, habits and sociological implications of sexual predators. The most obvious example of sexual predators is the violent sexual serial killer. Equivalent courses: CRIM 4311, CJ 4311 (through Summer 2023).  
CRIM 4376   Punishment   CRIM 4376 Punishment (3-0). In this course, we will review the public policy concerning the death penalty and punishment. We will further look into issues that may or may not affect the use of the death penalty within the various states. Equivalent courses: CJ 4376  
MTH 3301   Geometry   MTH 3301 Geometry (3-0). Modern formal development of Euclidean geometry with congruences and constructions. Introduction to other geometries as time permits. Prerequisite: MATH 2311/MTH 3309, MATH 2413, or permission of instructor. Equivalent courses: MATH 3301  
MTH 3302   Probability & Statistics I    
MTH 3302   Probability & Statistics I   MTH 3302 Probability and Statistics I (3-0). Descriptive statistics, probability, random variables and their distributions, estimation, and hypothesis testing. Prerequisite: MATH 1314 or permission of instructor. Equivalent courses: MATH 3302  
MTH 3305   History of Mathematics   MTH 3305 History of Mathematics (3-0). Biographies of mathematicians along with an exploration of the chronological development of important ideas in mathematics. Prerequisite: MATH 2413. Equivalent courses: MATH 3305  
MTH 3306   Special Topics: Algebraic Curv   MTH 3306 Special Topics (3-0). Discussion of selected topics in mathematics. Course may be repeated as topics vary. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.  
MTH 3306   Special Topics: Linear Algebra   MTH 3306 Special Topics (3-0). Discussion of selected topics in mathematics. Course may be repeated as topics vary. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Equivalent courses: MATH 3306  
MTH 3306   ST: Fourier Series   MTH 3306 Special Topics (3-0). Discussion of selected topics in mathematics. Course may be repeated as topics vary. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Equivalent courses: MATH 3306  
MTH 3307   Differential Equations   MTH 3307 Differential Equations (3-0). First-order differential equations, linear differential equations of higher order, systems of linear differential equations, and applications. Prerequisite: MATH 2414. Equivalent courses: MATH 3307  
MTH 3308   Found of Elem Mathematics I   MTH 3308 Foundations of Elementary Math I (3-0). Numeration systems, foundations of arithmetic, fractions and decimal numbers, measurement concepts, and problem solving. Elementary Education majors only. Prerequisite: MATH 1314  
MTH 3308   Survey Of Basic Math Thry I    
MTH 3309   Found of Elem Mathematics II   MTH 3309 Foundations of Elementary Math II (3-0). Geometric concepts, probability, statistics, estimation, problem solving and other related topics. Elementary Education majors only. Prerequisite: MTH 3308  
MTH 3309   Sur Of Basic Math Thry II    
MTH 3340   Foundations of Higher Math   MTH 3340 Foundations of higher Math (3-0). Organization and structure of mathematical thought. Writing and evaluating proofs. Topics include propositional logic, set theory, functions, sequences, relations, number theory, and graph theory. Prerequisite: MATH 2311 / MTH 3309 or MATH 2414.  
MTH 3340   Foundations of Higher Math   MTH 3340 Foundations of Higher Mathematics (3-0). Organization and structure of mathematical thought. Writing and evaluating proofs. Topics include propositional logic, set theory, functions, sequences, relations, number theory, and graph theory. Prerequisite: MATH 2311 / MTH 3309 or MATH 2414. Equivalent courses: MATH 3340  
MTH 3415   Calculus III   MTH 3415 Calculus III (3-0). Calculus of functions of several variables, including partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and vector calculus. Prerequisite: MATH 2414 with a C or better. Equivalent courses: MATH 2415 (through Summer 2014), MATH 3415  
MTH 3415   Calculus III - Lab   MTH 3415 Calculus III (3-0). Calculus of functions of several variables, including partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and vector calculus. Prerequisite: MATH 2414 with a C or better. Equivalent courses: MATH 2415 (through Summer 2014), MATH 3415  
MTH 3415   Calculus III Lab   MTH 3415 Calculus III (3-0). Calculus of functions of several variables, including partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and vector calculus. Prerequisite: MATH 2414 with a C or better. Equivalent courses: MATH 2415 (through Summer 2014), MATH 3415  
MTH 4301   Modern Abstract Algebra    
MTH 4301   Modern Abstract Algebra   MTH 4301 Modern Abstract Algebra (3-0). Congruence classes, group theory and its applications to number theory and geometry, introduction to rings, integral domains, and fields. Prerequisite: MATH 2318 and MATH 3301/MTH 3301 or permission of instructor. Equivalent courses: MTH 4301  
MTH 4320   Real Analysis   MTH 4320 Real Analysis (3-0). Topology of the real line, sequences, series, continuity, and differentiation. Prerequisite: MATH 2414. Equivalent courses: MATH 4320  
MTH 4360   Complex Variables I   MTH 4360 Complex Variables I (3-0). An introductory course covering functions of one complex variable. Topics will include: the algebra of complex numbers, geometry in the complex plane, polar representation of complex numbers, analytic functions, mappings, continuity, differentiability, Cauchy-Riemann equations, elementary functions of a complex variable, contour integrals and the Cauchy integral formula. Rotated with 4320 and 4330. Prerequisite: Math 2415. Equivalent courses: MATH 4360  
MTH 4390   Senior Project   MTH 4309 Senior Project (3-0). QEP mapped course. Directed individual studies in a mathematical topic of interest to the student. Emphasis on written and oral communication. Prerequisite: Completion of any 4000-level course with a C or better or permission of instructor.  
MTH 4390   Senior Project   MTH 4390 Senior Project (3-0). Directed individual studies in a mathematical topic of interest to the student. Emphasis on written and oral communication. Prerequisite: Completion of any 4000-level course with a C or better or permission of instructor. Equivalent courses: MATH 4390  
MTH 5301   Special Topics: Topology   MTH 5301 Special Topics in Mathematics (3-0). Selected topics in theoretical and applied mathematics. The course may be repeated for different topics. Offered when needed. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Equivalent courses: MATH 5301  
MTH 5301   ST: Regular Polytopes   MTH 5301 Special Topics in Mathematics (3-0). Selected topics in theoretical and applied mathematics. The course may be repeated for different topics. Offered when needed. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Equivalent courses: MATH 5301  
MTH 5307   Mathematics History    
MTH 5309   Advanced Algebra    
MTH 5311   Real Analysis   MTH 5311 Real Analysis (3-0). Metric spaces Lebesque measure integration differentiation function spaces and harmonic analysis. Prerequisite: MTH 4307 or permission of the instructor.  
MTH 5316   Fourier Ser&Ortho Funct   MTH 5316 Fourier Series and Orthogonal Functions (3-0). Function spaces orthogonal functions Fourier series Legendre polynomials spherical harmonics heat and temperature waves and vibrations. Prerequisite: MTH 3303 and MTH 3304 or permission of the instructor. Equivalent courses: MTH 5303 (through Summer 2022).  
NURS 3301   Trends and Issues in Prof Nurs   NURS 3301 Trends and Issues in Professional Nursing (3-0). Explores current societal health trends political issues informatics and trends related to nursing and contemporary health care. Application to professionalism empowerment and key components for clinical judgment.  
NURS 3303   Nursing Theories and Concepts   NURS 3303 Nursing Theories and Concepts (3-0). Exploration of nursing theories and concepts that provide the foundation for and guide nursing interventions. Analysis of multi-cultural concepts that apply to selected populations across the life span.  
NURS 3305   Nursing Research and App   NURS 3305 Nursing Research and Application (3-0). Basic concepts research principles processes and applications provide information for the role of the nurse as means of acquiring and refining knowledge and using data to enhance clinical judgment. Application of core concepts of informatics computer skills technology and ethical issues in patient confidentiality in clinical practice and data management.  
NURS 4301   Nursing Managt & Leadership    
NURS 4305   Pop-Focused Comm Health   NURS 4305 Population-Focused Community Health (3-0). Examines roles and functions of nurses within the community including epidemiologic principles. Emphasis is on application of community/public health concepts and design and implementation of nursing systems of care for individuals at-risk families and vulnerable populations with diverse needs.  
NURS 4307   Risk Ana Qual Mangt & Imp Pra   NURS 4307 Risk Analysis Quality Management and Implications for Practice (3-0). Application of ethical legal economic and political concepts to nursing practice. Identification of methods to decrease sentinel events through consistent promotion of nursing actions that influence quality improvement and simultaneously reduce morbidity and mortality.  
PSCH 3301   Social Psychology    
PSCH 3302   Personality Psychology   PSCH 3302 Personality Psychology (3-0). An introduction to personality theory, important personality theorists, and the significant factors in the development of personality across the life span. Prerequisite: Psychology 1302 or the equivalent, or consent of instructor.  
PSCH 3303   Positive Psychology   Positive psychology is the scientific study of the human mental strengths and virtues that allow people and communities to thrive. Topics such as optimism, hope, meaning, wisdom, transcendence, and courage are covered. Theoretical concepts including the broaden-and-build theory of emotions, self-efficacy, mindfulness, flow, learned optimism, social capital, and affective forecasting are addressed.  
PSCH 3303   Positive Psychology   PSCH 3303 Positive Psychology (3-0). Positive psychology is the scientific study of the human mental strengths and virtues that allow people and communities to thrive. Topics such as optimism, hope, meaning, wisdom, transcendence, and courage are covered. Theoretical concepts including the broaden-and-build theory of emotions, self-efficacy, mindfulness, flow, learned optimism, social capital, and affective forecasting are addressed. Equivalent courses: PSY 3303  
PSCH 3304   Abnormal Psychology   PSCH 3304 Abnormal Psychology (3-0). An investigation of behavioral disorders and the biological and social factors which may affect them. Prerequisite: Psychology 1302 or the equivalent, or consent of instructor.  
PSCH 3306   Child Development   PSCH 3306 Child Development (3-0). This course presents the major theories of child development and the milestones of physical, psychosocial, and cognitive development from the prenatal period through adolescence. Students identify the characteristics of play and its impact, describe the social development of children and adolescents, and understand the effects of a broad range of developmental influences. Equivalent courses: PSY 3306  
PSCH 3309   Psychology of Learning   PSCH 3309 Psychology of Learning (3-0). A review of animal and human research involving explanations of learning in everyday life which includes how the consequences of behavior affect future actions. Prerequisite: Psychology 1302 or the equivalent, or consent of instructor.  
PSCH 3310   Study Of Alcohol & Drug Prob    
PSCH 3311   Health Psychology   PSCH 3311 Health Psychology (3-0). This course is concerned with how psychology is related to health and illness. Issues addressed include seeking appropriate health care and adhering to medical advice, the effects of stress and how to manage stress, health habits such as proper nutrition and exercise, health problems such as obesity and substance abuse, and psychological responses to illness. Recommended for students in allied health fields. Prerequisite: Psychology 1302 or the equivalent, or consent of instructor.  
PSCH 3312   Human Sexuality    
PSCH 3315   Developmental Psychology   PSCH 3315 Developmental Psychology (3-0). The study of the developing human from birth to death, including physical, cognitive, emotional, and moral development. Prerequisite: Psychology 1302 or the equivalent, or consent of instructor.  
PSCH 3320   Cultural Psychology   PSCH 3320 Cultural Psychology(3-0). This course will concentrate on the study of behavior, cognition, and emotion in settings where people of different backgrounds interact, and on differences in behavior, cognition, and emotion that are correlated with cultural background. The material in this course is interconnected with many other areas in psychology, including developmental, abnormal, and social psychology.  
PSCH 4302   Industrial-Organizational Psy   PSCH 4302 Industrial-Organizational Psychology (3-0). Basic psychological principles of personnel work in business and industry. Significance and evaluation of individual differences, motivation, morale, and employer-employee relations. Equivalent courses: PSY 4302  
PSCH 4305   Gerontology   PSCH 4305 Gerontology (3-0). A survey of the issues relating to aging including family dynamics, retirement adjustments, legislation, mental health and physical health. Equivalent courses: PSY 4305  
PSCH 4310   ST: Overcoming Anxiety & Depre   PSCH 4310 Special Topics (3-0). Selected topics in psychology which are of particular interests to students of psychology. The course may be repeated for different topics. Prerequisite: Psychology 1302 or the equivalent, or consent of instructor.  
PSCH 4310   Topics: Overcoming Anx & Depre   PSCH 4310 Special Topics (3-0). Selected topics in psychology which are of particular interests to students of psychology. The course may be repeated for different topics. Prerequisite: Psychology 1302 or the equivalent, or consent of instructor. Equivalent courses: PSY 4310  
PSCH 4313   Forensic Psychology    
PSCH 4325   Cognitive Psychology   PSCH 4325 Cognitive Psychology (3-0). Introduces the study of human cognitive processes and covers perception, attention, memory, language, problem solving, reasoning, and decision-making. Focuses on basic research and theory in cognitive psychology but also considers their implications for everyday applications such as effective learning and retention, multitasking, and eyewitness testimony. Equivalent courses: PSY 4325  
PSCH 4330   Research in Psychology    
PSCH 4335   History of Psychology   Intended for students nearing graduation, this course is an overview of the history of psychological thought, with an emphasis on the advancement of investigative methods used in psychological research. The course traces modern psychology?s origins from its beginnings in philosophy, through its 19th century development as a basic science, to its current status as a multifaceted applied science. Prerequisite: senior-level status.  
SCER 3308   Foundatns of Elementary Sci. I   SCER 3308 Foundations of Elementary Science I (3-0). First course in a series of two in required science content sequence for preservice elementary and middle school teachers. Topics covered will include the following TEA science competencies: History and Nature of Science; Impact of Science; Concepts and Processes; Forces and Motion; Physical and chemical Properties; Energy and Interactions; Energy Transformation and Conservation; Structure and Function of Living Things; Reproduction and the Mechanisms of Heredity. Emphasis on problem-solving as a pedagogical tool with integration of manipulative-based explorations. For elementary education majors only. Offered fall. Equivalent courses: BIO 3308 (through Summer 2022), SCED 3308.  
SCER 3409   Found Elem Sci II   SCER 3409 Foundations of Elementary Science II (3-0). Second course in a series of two in required science content sequence for preservice elementary and middle school teachers. Topics covered will include the following TEA science competencies: Lab Processes Equipment && Safety; Students as Learners && Science Instruction; Science Assessment; Adaptions * Evolution; Organisms && the Environment; Structure && Function of Earth Systems; Cycles in Earth Systems; Energy in Weather && Climate; Solar System && the Universe. Emphasis on problem-solving as a pedagogical tool with integration of manipulative-based explorations. For elementary education majors only. Offered spring. Equivalent course: BIO 3309 (through Summer 2022).  
SCER 3409   Found Elem Sci II Lab   SCER 3409 Foundations of Elementary Science II (3-0). Second course in a series of two in required science content sequence for preservice elementary and middle school teachers. Topics covered will include the following TEA science competencies: Lab Processes Equipment && Safety; Students as Learners && Science Instruction; Science Assessment; Adaptions * Evolution; Organisms && the Environment; Structure && Function of Earth Systems; Cycles in Earth Systems; Energy in Weather && Climate; Solar System && the Universe. Emphasis on problem-solving as a pedagogical tool with integration of manipulative-based explorations. For elementary education majors only. Offered spring. Equivalent course: BIO 3309 (through Summer 2022).