2022 SRSU Undergraduate & Graduate Symposium – Virtual Presentation Schedule
Tuesday, April 12th, 2022

Click on a Session Time (left row of the schedule below) to jump down the page and view the Presentation Abstracts, Presenter Videos, & Session Recordings for that Session Time.

Noon-12:50

SRSU Symposium Spotlight Event:
Virtual Student Poster Presentation
Hosted & Moderated by Dr. Alicia Trotman
The virtual student poster presentations exhibit students’ proposals in Psychology, and posters in Education, and Conservation Biology.
Extended Time: Noon-1:20pm

CLICK HERE to see all presenter student information, poster/proposal abstracts, and view each poster PDF.

VIEW SPOTLIGHT EVENT RECORDING

Session
Time
Virtual Room A Virtual Room B Virtual Room C
1:00-1:20 Noon Poster Session Continues  Team Presenter: Christian Loveless, Clayton Dax Simon, Stephen Falick, Conner Archer
Moderator: Dr. Theron Francis (Literature and sustainability)
Title: “Bill McKibben and the Literature of Climate Change
(start: 1pm)
SESSION EVALUATION FORM
Presenter: Saul Jadon Baruch Barrientes
Moderator: Dr. Benjamin Barrientes (Philosophy)
Title: “On Ursula LeGuin’s “Those who walk away from Omelas”
(start: 1pm)
SESSION EVALUATION FORM

1:30-1:50

Team Presentation: Gray Hancock, Alyanna Hernandez, Brandon Ramirez, Adam Jones, Bryan Melendez
Moderator: Dr. Theron Francis (Literature and Natural Resource Management)
Title:Rivers in Environmental Literature
(start: 1:30pm)
SESSION EVALUATION FORM
Team Presentation: Hugo Flores, Richard Galvan
Moderator: Dr. Benjamin Barrientes (Criminal Justice)
Title: “Why Is Liability Not Uniform for White Collar Crime?”
(start: 1:30pm)
SESSION EVALUATION FORM
Team Presentation: Kelton Eason, Jorey Spencer, Brianna Berry, Cailey Saenz
Moderator: Dr. Jesse Kelsch (Literature and Natural Resource Management)
Title: “Literary Perspectives on the Conservation Ethic of Aldo Leopold”
(start: 1:30pm)
SESSION EVALUATION FORM
2:00-2:20 Team Presenter: Blaine Hunt, Alexis Belcher, Morgon Gottlieb, Michael Ramos
Moderator: Dr. Theron Francis (Literature philosophy sociology )
Title: “Religious and Cultural Perspectives in the Works of Barbara Kingsolver, Mary Oliver, Marjory Stoneman Douglas, and Leslie Marmon Silko”
(start: 2pm)
SESSION EVALUATION FORM
Presenter: Kiahna Garcia
Moderator: Dr. Audrey Taylor (Literary Themes)
Title: “Junji Ito and the Art of Horror World-Building”
(start: 2pm)
SESSION EVALUATION FORM

Team Presenter: Mark Metevier, Sinthea Mendoza, Ian Martinez, Katherine Peace, Azia Monk
Moderator: Dr. Kendra DeHart (Literature, Philosophy, Sociology)
Title: “Conservation Manifestoes as Literature”
(start: 2pm)
SESSION EVALUATION FORM

2:30-2:50 Team Presenter: Marley Rokas, Alexis Carmasino, Antonio Lozano, David Gallegos
Moderator: Dr. Theron Francis (Literature and Art)  
Title: “Environmentalism in the Works of Donald Judd, Dan Flavin, and Robert Irwin at the Chinati Foundation in Marfa”
(start: 2:30pm)
SESSION EVALUATION FORM
Team Presenter: Josh Moore, Thomas Birnbaum, Luis Villalpando, Nico Hinojosa
Moderator: Joslyn Sandlin (Literature and Natural Resource Management)  
Title: “Invasive Species & Stable Ecosystems”
(start: 2:30pm)
SESSION EVALUATION FORM
 
3:00-3:20
Presenter: Caleb Hughes
Moderator: Dr. Eric Busby (Wildlife Management)  
Title: “Winter Habitat Selection and Survival of Scaled Quail in the Trans-Pecos, Texas”
(start: 3pm)
SESSION EVALUATION FORM

Extended Time: 3:00pm-3:50pm
Team Presenters:
Robin Alvarez, Jason Fortner, Amanda L Frerich, Melissa Montoya, Anthony Javier Quintana, Edwin Urias, Kiahna Garcia
Moderator: Dr.  Sally Roche (Composition & Rhetoric)  
Title: “Tutoring Multilingual Writers at Hispanic-Serving Institutions”
(start: 3pm)
SESSION EVALUATION FORM

 
3:30-3:50 Presenter: Jason Crosby
Moderator: Dr. Eric Busby (Wildlife Management)
Title: “Comparing Precision and Scale-Transferability of Rangeland Monitoring Methods for Grassland Restoration in the Trans-Pecos, Texas”
(start: 3:30pm)
SESSION EVALUATION FORM
3pm Session Continues   
4:00-4:20 Presenter: Aaron Ortega
Moderator: Dr. Amanda Veals (Wildlife Management)
Title: “Evaluating the Efficiency of Watershed Restoration Methods in an Arid Environment”
SESSION CANCELLED
Presenter: Francisco Sanchez
Moderator: Jennifer Miller (Instructional and Educational Technology)
Title: “Connectivism Through Online Collaborative Spaces”
(start: 4pm)
SESSION EVALUATION FORM
 
4:30-4:50 Presenter: Estella Vega
Moderator: Dr. Alicia Trotman (Instructional and Educational Technology)
Title: “Student Perspective on Cyber Security: How Safe Is Our Information”
(start: 4:30pm)
SESSION EVALUATION FORM
Presenter: Derek Serrano
Moderator: Dr.Jennifer Miller (Instructional and Educational Technology)
Title: “Online Technology in Higher Education and the Impact on Learner and Instructor Experience”
(start: 4:30pm)
SESSION EVALUATION FORM
 
5:00-5:20

Extended Time: 5:00pm-5:50pm
Team Presenters: Ashley Quinones, Darissa Cervantes, Evelyn Perez
Moderator: Dr.Jennifer Miller (STEM Education)
Title: “Transforming Deeper Future Ready Learning Through the 4C’s”
(start: 5pm)
SESSION EVALUATION FORM

Extended Time: 5:00pm-5:50pm
Team Presenters: Anthony Quintana, Kiahna Garcia, Robin Alvarez
Moderator: Dr. Theron Francis (English)
Title: “The Sage: A Creative Journal for the Modern Digital Age”
(start: 5pm)
SESSION EVALUATION FORM

 
5:30-5:50 5pm Session Continues 


5pm Session Continues 

 

 

Noon – 12:50pm Symposium Spotlight Event – Virtual Poster Presentation 

Noon-12:50pm / SRSU Symposium Spotlight Event – Virtual Poster Presentation

Event Description: The virtual student poster presentations exhibit students’ proposals in Psychology, and posters in Education, and Conservation Biology. 
Event ModeratorDr. Alicia Trotman
GENERAL POSTER/PROPOSAL EVENT EVALUATION FORM

WATCH SPOTLIGHT EVENT RECORDING

Poster Presenters:
(1)
Presenter: Jacob Nunley
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Alicia Trotman (Psychology)
Title: “Examining the Benefits of Psychology Classes for Students’ Anxiety and Stress”
Virtual Presentation: Live poster presentation with follow-up – Undergraduate
Abstract: “Anxiety and stress in students can be the biggest hurdle for first-time college students who may not have the skills to manage their academic performance throughout. The benefits of mindfulness are evident, with many research topics covering its use and effectiveness. Considering how effective mindfulness is to reduce anxiety, stress, and depression, why it is only taught in psychology classes must be investigated. Does the exclusiveness of mindfulness education in psychology provide those students with an improved set of skills to manage their college stress and mental health? This study aims to investigate if college students who take psychology classes are using mindfulness in any way to manage their anxiety and stress levels.”
Poster PDF: SRSU Poster -Jacob Nunley
POSTER/PROPOSAL PRESENTER EVALUATION FORM

(2) Presenter: Kathryn Gallego
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Alicia Trotman (Psychology)
Title: “Investigating the Source of Higher Rates of Anxiety among Female College Students for Online Classes”
Virtual Presentation: Live poster presentation with follow-up – Undergraduate
Abstract: “The focus of this research is to examine the sources of anxiety among female college students when engaged in an online class. There has been a marked growth in online course offerings by universities and an increase in enrollment in those classes (Saade et al., 2017). This has resulted in an increase in research on anxiety associated with taking online classes (Li et al., 2021). Many studies report a higher level of anxiety among females when compared to male students (McKnight & McKnight, 2012; Saade et al, 2017; Yu, 2021). Little research has been conducted on the causes of this gap in anxiety between males and females. It is the hope of this research to identify the components of online course work that are related to feelings of anxiety among female college students.”
Poster PDF: SRSU Poster -Kathryn Gallego
POSTER/PROPOSAL PRESENTER EVALUATION FORM

(3) Presenter: Grace Knight
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Alicia Trotman (Psychology)
Title: “Examining how Emotional Distress in Athletic and Non-Athletic College Students Manifests in Localized Non-Specific Chronic Pain”
Virtual Presentation: Live poster presentation with follow-up – Undergraduate
Abstract: “In this examination, chronic pain along with emotional distress are the variables of focus. Emotional distress is hypothesized to manifest as non-specific localized chronic pain in female athletic and non-athletic college students. It is thought that students who are non-athletes will have a greater understanding of a connection between their emotional state and their chronic pain, rather than those who are athletes. The athletic students are hypothesized to attribute their pain to physical labor rather than associating it with their mental state. It has been found that pain can often express itself in more than just physical pain, and that emotional distress was a part of such expression (Goldbart et al., 2020). In another study the idea was supported that the sufferers of chronic pain experienced things like pain centrality, pain severity, and pain self-efficacy, which influenced their mental state (Sucher et al., 2020). A correlation could be made between emotional distress and chronic pain, and it has been found that some would experience these chronic feelings in areas of the body when having different negative emotions or distress (Lien et al., 2005). This examination of the correlation of chronic pain and emotional distress considers the impact of COVID-19 as a stressor or a point of influence in both variables, as it has been found to have such an influence on people’s mental state (Consonni et al., 2020). This study used the guidance of previous research to develop its measures, although it was limited in its instruments. A previous study used pain stimulating instruments; while this examination will focus on the recall of its participants and their responses (McHugh et al., 2019).”
Poster PDF: SRSU Poster – Grace Knight
POSTER/PROPOSAL PRESENTER EVALUATION FORM

(4) Presenter: Sara Ray
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Alicia Trotman (Psychology)
Title: “Exploration of Second Language Learners’ motivation and Simpatía among Students in West Texas”
Virtual Presentation: Live poster presentation with follow-up – Undergraduate
Abstract: “This research study explored motivational factors of aspiring bilinguals (L2’s) compared to those identified in previous studies among college students in the Southwestern United States. L1 refers to monolingual speakers and L2 refers to students learning a second language (Campbell & Storch, 2011). Previous research on motivation of learning a second language suggested that certain themes among students emerge regarding learning the target language such as positive feelings toward native speakers, personal goals, identity factors, and external pressure (Campbell & Storch, 2011). Our first aim was to determine if these themes were reflected in the student population. The second purpose was to depict cultural values as measured by the Simpatía Scale (Acevedo et al., 2020) and its subsequent relationship to L2 motivation. The initial sample was 51 participants, and after removing missing data, the final sample was 32 participants (16 L1s and 16 L2s). For the first research question, the themes identified were beneficial feelings towards (1) communicating with family members and (2) having deeper relations with native speakers. The latter theme is similar to one identified by Campbell & Storch (2011), yet the first is markedly different. Those participants who choose to learn a second language possibly yearn for a deeper bond with their extended family members. This finding may connect with the rationale Acevedo et al. (2020) described for Latino populations having greater agreeableness and openness to help others, especially when they communicate in Spanish compared to English. The quantitative findings supported this assertion with the significance only occurring for L2 participants who preferred to avoid conflict compared to L1s, r(16) = .545, p < .001). In addition, when Spanish-speaking is not welcomed, it seems that the cultural value of Simpatía dissolves and L2s admitted to being less comfortable in English-speaking only settings. Concluding, it is plausible that Simpatía is more common among L2s than L1s.”
Poster PDF: SRSU Poster – SaraRay
POSTER/PROPOSAL PRESENTER EVALUATION FORM

(5) Presenter: Janel Sotelo
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Alicia Trotman (Psychology)
Title: “Review of Parental Influence on Depressive Symptoms among Mexican American Female Adolescents”
Virtual Presentation: Live poster presentation with follow-up – Undergraduate
Abstract: “Latinx or Hispanic youth appear to be at a higher risk of depression and anxiety than their other ethnic peers (Gonzales et al., 2006; Stein & Polo, 2013). Using multiple research articles, this Literature Review assesses how depression and anxiety symptoms can be related to parenting in the Mexican culture, and broadly the Latinx culture. Specifically, there are gaps in the research where most of the studies center on Latinos or male parenting, and co-opt the symptoms diagnosed with Mexican-American youth culture with other Hispanic youth. This is ill-advised because Mexican Americans have a particular cultural aspect being closer to the border than other Latinx American communities. This means that the depression and anxiety symptoms may be more complex because youth are trying to manage their American and Mexican identities in a bicultural environment. The review explores the inconsistencies in the literature.”
Poster PDF: SRSU Poster – Janel Sotelo
POSTER/PROPOSAL PRESENTER EVALUATION FORM

(6) Presenter: Larissa Valenzuela
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Alicia Trotman (Psychology)
Title: “Review of Early Developmental Outcomes among Mexican American Youth with English as a Second Language (ESL) ”
Virtual Presentation: Live poster presentation with follow-up – Undergraduate
Abstract: “It is unclear in the literature how executive cognitive functions influence language development. The executive functions include processes such as attention, management, planning, monitoring, and inhibition of habitual responses. This literature review was conducted to conclude which executive function processes contribute to language development among Mexican Americans with English as a Second Language (ESL).”
Poster PDF: SRSU Poster – Larissa Valenzuela
POSTER/PROPOSAL PRESENTER EVALUATION FORM

(7) Presenter: Daniel Flores
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Alicia Trotman (Psychology)
Title: “Investigating the Correlation between Fantasy Action Video Games and Advanced Vocabulary Acquisition”
Virtual Presentation: Live poster presentation with follow-up – Undergraduate
Abstract: “Video games contain a vast array of stories that carry a wide range of vocabulary and terminologies. Since there is a large amount of vocabulary in video games, vocabulary acquisition through gaming can be examined. In a study by Vasquez and Ovalle (2019), participants were found to develop their English vocabulary after four weeks of playing video games (Vásquez & Ovalle, 2019). Vocabulary acquisition can be attributed to the games’ narrative contexts (Piirainen-Marsh & Tainio, 2009). Additionally, the type of experience can influence their acquisition and interpretation of these words (Eligio & Kaschak, 2019). The hypothesis is that gamers who play fantasy-action games would be more likely to accurately define advanced vocabulary than other gamers or non-gamers. This quasi-experiment design examines the correlation between fantasy-action gamers and non-gamers in their comprehension of advanced vocabulary of college students. There will need to be a minimum of 20 participants in each group of fantasy-action gamers and non-gamers for a total of 40 minimum participants. These participants will be randomly assigned to the experimental group (gamers) and control group (non-gamers). I expect to find that the gamers will be able to form more accurate definitions for vocabulary words than the non-gamers.”
Poster PDF: SRSU Poster – Daniel Flores
POSTER/PROPOSAL PRESENTER EVALUATION FORM

(8) Presenter: Oliver Flores
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Alicia Trotman (Psychology)
Title: “Examining Mood Induction Procedures and their Link to Attitudes”
Virtual Presentation: Live poster presentation with follow-up – Undergraduate
Abstract: “This is a quantitative study aimed at examining the interaction, if any, between primed moods and then subsequently formed attitudes. Specifically, this research is analyzing whether a positive mood state, primed by a mood induction procedure (in the form of a video) will impact attitudes formed towards a neutral stimulus (in the form of a digital image). The purpose of this research is to add to the existing body of knowledge about moods and attitudes within the social sciences. More knowledge about the impact of moods on attitude formation could significantly impact any further research on these concepts. Data will be collected through a variety of semantic differential and Likert style tests designed to measure affective states.”
Poster PDF: SRSU Poster – Oliver Flores
POSTER/PROPOSAL PRESENTER EVALUATION FORM

(9) Presenter: Michelle Plante
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Alicia Trotman (Psychology)
Title: “Examining the Use of Faith-Based Therapies to Manage PTSD Symptoms among College Students”
Virtual Presentation: Live poster presentation with follow-up – Undergraduate
Abstract: “Trauma has become a buzzword for many in the past decade because it has affected so many different groups of people at different phases of their lives. Lehmann & Steele (2020) report that trauma is connected to physiological, psychological, and interpersonal outcomes. Specifically, these outcomes can arise from events that include natural disasters such as terrorism, mass violence, hurricanes, and more recently a pandemic (Aten, Smith, Hook, Ranter, Van Tongeren, Davis, Shannonhouse, De Blaere, O’Grady & Hill, 2019). The trauma that transpires physiologically, psychologically, and interpersonally can affect one’s stance with their religion and spirituality in terms of a disruption of one’s beliefs about how the world works, their relationship to the divine, their coping mechanisms, and the quality of their social support network (Aten et al., 2019). Lehman & Steele (2020) conducted a study examining the correlation between Posttraumatic Stress (PTS) and Perceived Posttraumatic Growth (PPTG). Their findings were that Active Surrender, Religious purification/forgiveness, and religious direction/ conversion were all associated positively with decreased PTS. The objective of this study is to find out if Active Surrender is the most common coping strategy among college students managing symptoms following a traumatic event. The findings will add to the body of research for college students who may have some level of PTSD and their ways of coping as influenced by their religious and spiritual beliefs.”
Poster PDF: SRSU Poster – Michelle Plante
POSTER/PROPOSAL PRESENTER EVALUATION FORM

10) Presenter: Caitlin Camp
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Patricia Moody Harveson (Conservation Biology)
Title: “Distribution and Co-Occurrence of Carnivores in Big Bend National Park”
Virtual Presentation: Live poster presentation with follow-up – Graduate
Abstract: “Carnivores are essential for the structure and function of ecosystems as they have a significant impact on lower trophic levels. Carnivore communities are shaped by habitat and resource availability as well as species interactions, such as intraguild predation and competition. Big Bend National Park is inhabited by fourteen carnivore species that include large carnivores and mesocarnivores. Large carnivores include mountain lions (Puma concolor) and black bears (Ursus americanus). Mesocarnivores include bobcats (Lynx rufus), badgers (Taxidea taxis), coyotes (Canis latrans), kit fox (Vulpes macrotis), gray fox (Urocyon cinereoargenteus), raccoons (Procyon lotor), ringtails (Bascarisscus astutus), long-tailed weasels (Mustela frenata), hooded skunks (Mephitis macroura), hog-nosed skunks (Conepatus lecontei), spotted skunks (Spilogale gracilis), and striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis). To better understand these species interactions, cameras were placed within and surrounding the Chisos Mountains to monitor detections and further determine habitat characteristics that could influence a species presence, such as habitat type and elevation. To produce image recognition data, MegaDetector was used on all photos, as well as Timelapse2 to identify and label species. Approximately 800,000 photos were collected from fifty-five of fifty-eight camera trap locations within the study area between 2014 to 2016. Our study summarizes the distribution, habitat characteristics, and co-occurrence of carnivores in BBNP.”
Poster PDF: SRSU Poster – Caitlin Camp
POSTER/PROPOSAL PRESENTER EVALUATION FORM

11) Team Presenters: Dadra Ross, Trisha Hunter
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Lisa Thompson Sousa (Education)
Title: “Five Ways to Build Reading Fluency Using Evidence-Based Practices”
Virtual Presentation: Live poster presentation with follow-up – Graduate
Abstract: “This presentation examines evidence-based interventions commonly used to increase a student’s fluency rate in the general education classroom. Data was collected through a meta-analysis of five commonly used interventions in elementary school classrooms: peer coaching, repeated reading, model reading, individualized goal setting with teacher feedback, and word recognition drills. Results show that, in order for an intervention to have the most benefit, students must be presented with repeated exposure to text at their instructional reading level. Based on the data, constructive feedback, interactive progress monitoring, and appropriate goal setting help improve students’ abilities to read at an increased rate. Peer-led and teacher-led interventions can help struggling readers build their basic reading skills and confidence levels. Because word recognition and reading rate are foundational to reading comprehension, elementary school teachers must implement effective interventions to provide their students with the tools necessary to obtain information through text exposure.”
Poster PDF: SRSU Poster – Dadra Ross, Trisha Hunter
POSTER/PROPOSAL PRESENTER EVALUATION FORM

Jump Back Up to Schedule

1:00 – 1:20pm Session Presentations – Student Information and Abstracts

1:00-1:20pm / Virtual Room A – Moderator: Dr. Theron Francis

Team Presenter: Christian Loveless, Clayton Dax Simon, Stephen Falick, Conner Archer
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Theron Francis 
Title: “Bill McKibben and the Literature of Climate Change
Virtual Presentation: Pre-recorded video presentation with live follow-up – Undergraduate
Abstract: “This panel presentation will discuss the rhetorical strategies employed by Bill McKibben since the publication of The End of Nature. The panel will consider the larger social and political context as well as alternative efforts among environmentalists to move public opinion and prevent a climate catastrophe.
Literature and sustainability.”

PRESENTER VIDEO SESSION RECORDING

1:00-1:20pm / Virtual Room B – Moderator: Dr. Benjamin Barrientes

Presenter: Saul Jadon Baruch Barrientes
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Benjamin Barrientes 
Title: “On Ursula LeGuin’s “Those who walk away from Omelas”
Virtual Presentation: Pre-recorded video presentation with live follow-up – Undergraduate
Abstract: “Ursula Le Guin’s short story, “Those who walk away from Omelas,” presents us with a dilemma: “Can we live knowing that others are suffering?” Through this presentation, I argue that we choose which side to take on the matter. Le Guin builds an interesting tapestry of a town that is celebrating a holiday. She describes, in nuanced detail what the townspeople are like and what constitutes their hopes and dreams. In this ideal town there is a shameful secret, specifically, to those that are not part of the daily grind of existing in this place (i.e., Omelas). The secret represents human nature’s tendency to ignore its treatment of a child. We are left to explore and examine the moral significance of this tale.”

PRESENTER VIDEO SESSION RECORDING

Jump Back Up to Schedule

1:30 – 1:50pm Session Presentations – Student Information and Abstracts

1:30-1:50pm / Virtual Room A – Moderator: Dr.Theron Francis

Team Presentation: Gray Hancock, Alyanna Hernandez, Brandon Ramirez, Adam Jones, Bryan Melendez
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Theron Francis 
Title: Rivers in Environmental Literature
Poster/Presentation: Pre-recorded video presentation with live follow-up – Undergraduate
Abstract:This is a panel presentation on differing literary perspectives on the conservation of Southwestern rivers, covering such authors as John Graves, John McPhee, John Muir, Mark Reisner, Henry Thoreau and Edward Abbey. The presentations will reflect on literary representations of river ecology while considering arguments about threats to river habitats, such as dams and agricultural, urban and industrial development.
Literature and natural resource management

PRESENTER VIDEO SESSION RECORDING

1:30-1:50pm / Virtual Room B – Moderator: Dr.Benjamin Barrientes

Team Presentation: Hugo Flores, Richard Galvan
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Benjamin Barrientes 
Title: “Why Is Liability Not Uniform for White Collar Crime?”
Poster/Presentation: Pre-recorded video presentation with live follow-up – Undergraduate
Abstract: “In his paper, “Street Crime, Corporate Crime, and the Contingency of Criminal Activity,” Darryl Brown argues that liability is not the same for white collar (i.e. Corporate) crime and street crime. There is a perception in criminal justice that the perpetrators of street crime are somehow more “deserving” of certain legal liabilities. Our contention is that white collar crime entails heavier costs to businesses, but criminal liability is not uniform. We argue that this lack of balance in justice is a reflection of how much work society needs to accomplish in order to address this issue.

PRESENTER VIDEO SESSION RECORDING

1:30-1:50pm / Virtual Room C – Moderator: Dr. Jesse Kelsch

Team Presentation: Kelton Eason, Jorey Spencer, Brianna Berry, Cailey Saenz
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Theron Francis 
Title: “Literary Perspectives on the Conservation Ethic of Aldo Leopold”
Poster/Presentation: Pre-recorded video presentation with live follow-up – Undergraduate
Abstract: “This panel presentation offers literary interpretations of Aldo Leopold’s canonical works in conservation ecology: The Sand County Almanac, “Thinking Like a Mountain,” and “The Land Ethic.” The shift in values that Leopold advocates will be explained, as well as the literary devices used to reconnect readers to the natural environment.

PRESENTER VIDEO SESSION RECORDING

Jump Back Up to Schedule

2:00 – 2:20pm Session Presentations – Student Information and Abstracts

2:00-2:20pm / Virtual Room A – Moderator: Dr.Theron Francis

Team Presenter: Blaine Hunt, Alexis Belcher, Morgon Gottlieb, Michael Ramos
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Theron Francis 
Title: “Religious and Cultural Perspectives in the Works of Barbara Kingsolver, Mary Oliver, Marjory Stoneman Douglas, and Leslie Marmon Silko”
Poster/Presentation: Pre-recorded video presentation with live follow-up – Undergraduate
Abstract: “This panel will discuss how religious and cultural values influence the environmentalism of authors: Alva Supit, Nancy Bawiling, Barbara Kingsolver, Mary Oliver, and Leslie Marmon Silko. These authors’ differing heritages offer a store of literary allusions as well as values regarding the natural environment. The presentation will also consider the sacredness of nature in different religious traditions.

PRESENTER VIDEO SESSION RECORDING

2:00-2:20pm / Virtual Room B – Moderator: Dr. Audrey Taylor

Presenter: Kiahna Garcia
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Audrey Taylor 
Title: “Junji Ito and the Art of Horror World-Building”
Poster/Presentation: Pre-recorded video presentation with live follow-up – Graduate
Abstract: “The Horrific World of Junji Ito: World-building in the Horror Genre. World-building in the horror genre relies on realistic settings and the understanding of the familiar to invoke fear. In the creative works of a famous Japanese mangaka (manga artist), Junji Ito, he defamiliarizes the familiar through the drastic transformation of environments, characters, and narratives to build a world full of fear and chaos. As seen through his artwork and narrative style, Ito uses urban settings, supernatural women, grotesque monsters, supernatural objects, and Japanese social anxieties to convey four common themes: sexual desire, guilt, paranoia, and mental trauma. This paper will analyze world-building in the horror genre by examining physical environments, characters, narrative styles, and artwork in Junji Ito’s short manga stories and graphic novels, such as Tomie, Uzumaki, and Gyo. This paper will also argue how Ito world-builds around literary themes to further express those themes in his creative works.

PRESENTER VIDEO SESSION RECORDING

2:00-2:20pm / Virtual Room C – Moderator: Dr.Kendra DeHart

Team Presenter: Mark Metevier, Sinthea Mendoza, Ian Martinez, Katherine Peace, Azia Monk
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Theron Francis
Title: “Conservation Manifestoes as Literature”
Poster/Presentation: Pre-recorded video presentation with live follow-up – Undergraduate
Abstract:This panel will present the arguments made in the principle manifestoes of American environmentalism including Muir’s defense of the Hetch Hetchy Valley, Wallace Stegner’s “Wilderness Letter,” Lydia Huntley Sigourney, W.S. Merwin’s “Place,” and Wendell Berry’s “Manifesto: Mad Farmer Liberation Front.

PRESENTER VIDEO SESSION RECORDING


Jump Back Up to Schedule

2:30 – 2:50pm Session Presentations – Student Information and Abstracts

2:30-2:50pm / Virtual Room A – Moderator: Dr.Theron Francis

Team Presenter: Marley Rokas, Alexis Carmasino, Antonio Lozano, David Gallegos
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Theron Francis 
Title: “Environmentalism in the Works of Donald Judd, Dan Flavin, and Robert Irwin at the Chinati Foundation in Marfa”
Poster/Presentation: Pre-recorded video presentation with live follow-up – Undergraduate
Abstract: “This panel will discuss how the written and artistic artifacts of Donald Judd, Dan Flavin, and Robert Irwin relate to the environment. The presentation will consider how these artists’ works at the Chinati Foundation influence environmental activism and enhance viewers’ environmental awareness. Finally, the panel will report on literary responses by SRSU students to the artwork at Chinati.

PRESENTER VIDEO SESSION RECORDING

2:30-2:50pm / Virtual Room B – Moderator: Joslyn Sandlin

Team Presenter: Josh Moore, Thomas Birnbaum, Luis Villalpando, Nico Hinojosa
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Theron Francis 
Title: “Invasive Species & Stable Ecosystems”
Poster/Presentation: Pre-recorded video presentation with live follow-up – Undergraduate
Abstract:This panel will present varying perspectives on the idea of Invasive Species in the literary works of E.O. Wilson, Rachel Carson, Susan Cooper, and Aldo Leopold. 

PRESENTER VIDEO SESSION RECORDING


Jump Back Up to Schedule

3:00 – 3:20pm Session Presentations – Student Information and Abstracts

3:00-3:20pm / Virtual Room A – Moderator: Dr. Eric Busby

Presenter: Caleb Hughes
Faculty Mentor: Dr.Justin French 
Title: “Winter Habitat Selection and Survival of Scaled Quail in the Trans-Pecos, Texas”
Poster/Presentation: Pre-recorded video presentation with live follow-up – Graduate
Abstract: “Scaled quail (Callipepla squamata) is an important species throughout the Trans-Pecos region of Texas for economic and ecological reasons. However, scaled quail populations have steadily declined across their range since the 1960s. Proposed reasons for the decline include predation, disease, and habitat loss. Previous studies have examined habitat selection, survival, and ecology of scaled quail during the reproductive season to understand the needs of this species. However, the preceding winter season is an influential period on scaled quail populations due to its influence on juvenile recruitment and available brood stock. Despite the importance of winter on population dynamics, little research has been done concerning habitat use and survival during the winter. Global Positioning System (GPS) and radio telemetry equipment have increased our ability to gain knowledge of wildlife ecology and habitat selection. This project aims to help fill the void in our knowledge of scaled quail’s winter ecology by examining and describing habitat use and survival using GPS telemetry technology during the winter. I will trap quail during the winters of 2022-2023 and 2023-2024 using walk-in funnel traps and fit them with aluminum leg bands and GPS backpacks to obtain location data and observe habitat selection and survival rates across the season. Location data will then be used to quantify quail selection for soil, topography, and vegetation characteristics using integrated Step Selection Functions. Data from this project will help us assess how scaled quail utilize habitat in the winter and how quail populations can be impacted by winter survival.

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3:00 – 3:50pm Session Presentations – Student Information and Abstracts

3:00-3:50pm / Virtual Room B – Moderator: Dr. Sally Roche

Team Presenters: Robin Alvarez, Jason Fortner, Amanda L Frerich, Melissa Montoya, Anthony Javier Quintana, Edwin Urias, Kiahna Garcia
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Sally Roche 

Title: “Tutoring Multilingual Writers at Hispanic-Serving Institutions”
Poster/Presentation: Live student group or panel virtual event – 50 min session max virtual event – Graduate
Abstract: “At HSIs, Writing Center tutors explore both barriers and promises of enhancing the tutoring of writing. Our research explores ways to encourage student visits to the writing center. Contributing to more culturally relevant approaches are projects about the familia approach and about how cultural differences affect tutoring style. Projects focused on tutoring methods include addressing perceived language barriers, using TESOL to design scaffolding, helping students acquire and use academic language, asserting the importance of grammar to communicating ideas, and maintaining students’ own ideas and voices. All of these studies occur in the context of the delivery of tutoring help: a study on implementing digital technology for synchronous and asynchronous tutoring sessions addresses this context.

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3:30 – 3:50pm Session Presentations – Student Information and Abstracts

3:30-3:50pm / Virtual Room A – Moderator: Dr. Eric Busby

Presenter: Jason Crosby
Faculty Mentor: Dr.Justin French 
Title: “Comparing Precision and Scale-Transferability of Rangeland Monitoring Methods for Grassland Restoration in the Trans-Pecos, Texas”
Poster/Presentation: Pre-recorded video presentation with live follow-up – Graduate
Abstract: “Rangeland ecosystems make up nearly half of the earth’s land surface. These landscapes provide habitat for various flora and fauna and provide important ecosystem services. However, anthropogenic activities such as habitat fragmentation and excessive livestock grazing regimes have transformed rangelands into brush-dominated landscapes. The consequences of habitat degradation include loss of wildlife, soil erosion, reduced water harvest, and lower carbon sequestration. Such concerns drive restoration and many monitoring methods exist to measure such efforts. Detecting change from restoration is essential to determining its efficacy. My project aims to compare methods to evaluate the rate of change for brush cover and herbaceous production after restoration efforts. I will use satellite-derived spectral data from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration/United States Geological Survey Landsat Program and manual monitoring from the Grassland Effectiveness Monitoring (GEM) methods. This will determine the scales at which Landsat data can capture change in brush communities with an equal or greater degree of precision than the GEM. For herbaceous plant production, I will compare remotely-sensed data from Landsat and replicated unmanned aerial sensor imagery to the GEM method and fine-scale spectral imagery. My analysis will also determine gains per unit cost (in terms of hours and dollars per change in unit of precision). Determining which methods are most efficient at assessing rates of change following restoration in these landscapes will assist stakeholders in the planning and implementing of grassland restoration in the region.

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4:00 – 4:50pm Session Presentations – Student Information and Abstracts

4:00-4:20pm / Virtual Room A – Moderator: Dr. Amanda Veals

Presenter: Aaron Ortega
Faculty Mentor: Dr.Justin French 
Title: “Evaluating the Efficiency of Watershed Restoration Methods in an Arid Environment”
Poster/Presentation: Live team presentation with follow-up – Graduate
Abstract: “Scaled quail (Callipepla squamata) populations within the Chihuahuan desert have shown a decline in their population in recent years. Leading causes for the decline are habitat degradation and weather patterns causing higher mortalities during periods of stress such as summer and winter. Habitat degradation results from a group of processes that cause soil degradation (erosion) and the capacity to capture and infiltrate water, which causes a decrease in biological productivity and biodiversity. The erosion process starts when vegetation cover is removed, and the soil is exposed to rain and water flow that drag soil particles. As a result of habitat loss, scaled quail populations decrease when essential resources such as food, water, and cover are absent. For example, habitat requirements such as vegetation structure, plant species diversity, and spatial arrangement for reproduction and survival are vital for scaled quail. However, despite the importance of habitat for scaled quail, few studies have evaluated habitat response to restoration treatments. To address habitat loss, restoration efforts such trincheras are used as structures made with rocks installed in the base of a creek in a cross-sectional way. This allows reduction of the velocity of the water flow and filter soil sediments to retain humidity and soil components to create sediment banks where plants may be established and cover the ground. My project aims to establish trincheras within degraded habitats to improve habitat conditions. Specifically, I will assess differences in vegetation biomas, cover, and diversity response to trincheras. This study’s results will indicate if these techniques effectively increase the health of the scaled quail habitat, and stakeholders will use results for future management of scaled quail and habitat restoration.”

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4:00-4:20pm / Virtual Room B – Moderator: Dr. Jennifer Miller

Presenter: Francisco Sanchez
Title: “Connectivism Through Online Collaborative Spaces”
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jennifer Miller 
Title: “Connectivism Through Online Collaborative Spaces”
Poster/Presentation: Live team presentation with follow-up – Graduate
Abstract: “As technology advances into more decentralized forms, so has educational learning theories in the form of connectivism. However, connectivism’s current embodiment through massive open online courses (MOOC) has been fettered with lackluster completion rates. The purpose of this study is to identify MOOC variations that optimize engagement through the use of online collaborative spaces. This literature review focuses on hybrid MOOC design, student-generated content, and more intermediate human elements to MOOCs. The result is that current societal paradigms need some scaffolding in the form of andragogy, online-community building, social-constructivist online frameworks, and a combination of human and algorithmic-machine feedback to increase engagement and higher MOOCs completion rates. Mastering this intermediate level can assist us in providing the next generation enough momentum to embrace connectivism and MOOCs in their purest forms fully.”

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4:30 – 4:50pm Session Presentations – Student Information and Abstracts

4:30-4:50pm / Virtual Room A – Moderator: Dr. Alicia Trotman

Presenter: Estella Vega
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jennifer Miller 
Title: Student Perspective on Cyber Security: How Safe Is Our Information
Poster/Presentation: Pre-recorded video presentation with live follow-up – Graduate
Abstract: “Technology varies in its applications across the spectrum of education. With online instruction increasing in popularity, examining how technology affects the educational experiences of learners and instructors is now a crucial step in determining how successful that relationship can be. The content within this review focuses on the technologies as tools and resources, as well as their impacts on different groups of learners and their environments. This review does not include a comprehensive study of all forms of technology; instead, the research discussed centers on specific digital technologies and the resulting performance of the learners and instructors within the study parameters. The research data will also be compared among the technologies and methods of the collected studies to identify connections that address potential gaps or trends in learning outcomes. The author also will propose the continued exploration of technologies and their impacts on learning environments, specifically suggesting further research toward the acquisition of technology by higher education institutions in the age of online instruction.”

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4:30-4:50pm / Virtual Room B – Moderator: Dr. Jennifer Miller

Presenter: Derek Serrano
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jennifer Miller 
Title: “Online Technology in Higher Education and the Impact on Learner and Instructor Experience”
Poster/Presentation: Pre-recorded video presentation with live follow-up – Graduate
Abstract:Considering the rising amount of technology use in today’s world and over recent decades, the call for schools to produce digitally advanced students in technology-integrated classrooms is high. This paper explores the need for professional development for technology integration that focuses on student learning and outcomes as the objective. With a wide number of professional development for technology integration focused on teaching the educator how to use the technology rather than how to integrate it, the need for redesigning professional development to gear it in the right direction for student digital literacy is at an all-time high. To achieve an effective design of professional development for technology integration, an evaluation of student learning outcomes is more crucial now than ever before. The literature reviewed offers insight into what is being looked at and what is being looked for when developing and designing professional development for technology integration within recent decades. The purpose of the study is to gain insight into what teachers in remote areas of the Texas/Mexico border need in terms of professional development for instructional technology integration.

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5:00 – 5:20pm Session Presentations – Student Information and Abstracts

5:00-5:50pm / Virtual Room A – Moderator: Dr. Jennifer Miller

Team Presenters: Ashley Quinones, Darissa Cervantes, Evelyn Perez
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jennifer Miller 
Title: “Transforming Deeper Future Ready Learning Through the 4C’s”
Poster/Presentation: Live student group or panel virtual event – 50 min session max virtual event – Undergraduate
Abstract: “This panel will identify skills and competencies to prepare middle school and high school STEM students for the needs of our future workforce. Participants will explore and learn how to foster community engagement, creativity and innovation. A strong future-ready skill set can be acquired through instructional design approaches using the 4 C’s: communication, collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity. Instruction that prepares for the future employs best practices toward effective technology integration using emerging technologies in the STEM classroom.”

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5:00-5:50pm / Virtual Room B – Moderator: Dr.Theron Francis

Presenter: Anthony Quintana, Kiahna Garcia, Robin Alvarez
Faculty Mentor: Dr.Theron Francis 
Title: “The Sage: A Creative Journal for the Modern Digital Age”
Presentation: Live student group or panel virtual event – 50 min session max virtual event – Undergraduate / Graduate
Abstract: “This will be a panel discussion of the evolution of Sul Ross’ literary journal from the 1950s to the current edition. The panel will discuss the creative process involved in individual submissions and in the selection and construction of the finished journal. The relationship between visual and verbal artistry will also be considered. It will conclude with a look at the future of the Sage and the forms it could aspire to reach.

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5:30 – 5:50pm Session Presentations – Student Information and Abstracts

There are no presentations currently scheduled for this time period.

   

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