2021 SRSU Undergraduate & Graduate Symposium – Virtual Presentation Schedule
Wednesday, April 14th, 2021

Click on a Session Time (left row of the schedule below) to jump down the page and view the Presentation Abstracts, Presenter Videos, & Session Recordings for that Session Time.

Noon-12:50

SRSU Symposium Spotlight Event:
Live Panel Discussion Presentation:
Experiencing the Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP): 
The Student’s Perspective

Hosted by SRSU Assistant VP of Institutional Effectiveness
Dr. Jeanne Qvarnstrom
Moderated by Dr. Thomas Matula 
SRSU students will describe communication projects assigned in their QEP courses. QEP mapped courses are offered in all subject areas.  Student panelists will be talking about their communication assignments from animal science and psychology courses.  Assignments in the QEP courses are a variety of oral, written, and visual communications including a Creative Journaling Project.

Click on the “Noon-12:50″ session time link at left to see information on QEP panel student presenters.
WATCH SPOTLIGHT EVENT RECORDING

Session
Time
Virtual Room A Virtual Room B
1:00-1:20    

1:30-1:50

   
2:00-2:20

 
2:30-2:50    
3:00-3:20
Extended Time: 3:00pm-3:50pm
Team Presenters: Emma Morales, Yaritza Corona, Crysty Graves-Herrera, Cristian Sanchez, Avery Callaway, Cierra Noel Greer, Kendall Hughs
Moderator: Dr. Carolyn Barrientes (Theater)  
Title:Teniamos Todo” Talk-Back Session
(start: 3pm)
 
3:30-3:50 3pm Session Continues Presenter: Sharon Barrett 
Moderator: Benjamin Barrientes (Behavioral & Social Sciences)
Title:“Reserved to the People”: The Right to Give Birth in the United States
SESSION CANCELLED
4:00-4:20    
4:30-4:50    
5:00-5:20

Extended Time: 5:00pm-5:50pm
Presenter:
Daniel Carrillo
Moderator: Dr. Kris Jorgenson (Math)
Title: Geometric Vanishes
(start: 5pm)

 
5:30-5:50 5pm Session Continues  

Noon – 12:50pm Symposium Spotlight Event – Virtual Panel QEP Presentation

Noon-12:50pm / SRSU Symposium Spotlight Event – QEP Virtual Panel Presentation: Experiencing the Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP): The Student’s Perspective

Event Description: SRSU students will describe communication projects assigned in their QEP courses. QEP mapped courses are offered in all subject areas.  Student panelists will be talking about their communication assignments from animal science and psychology courses.  Assignments in the QEP courses are a variety of oral, written, and visual communications including a Creative Journaling Project.  
Event ModeratorDr. Thomas Matula
Hosted By – Dr. Jeanne Qvarnstrom 
QEP Student Team Presenters
Kensi Parker, Katrina Munoz, Grace Knight

WATCH SPOTLIGHT EVENT RECORDING

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1:00 – 1:20pm Session Presentations – Student Information and Abstracts

1:00-1:20pm
There are no presentations currently scheduled for this time period.

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1:30 – 1:50pm Session Presentations – Student Information and Abstracts

1:30-1:50pm
There are no presentations currently scheduled for this time period.

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2:00 – 2:20pm Session Presentations – Student Information and Abstracts

2:00-2:50pm
There are no presentations currently scheduled for this time period.

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2:30 – 2:50pm Session Presentations – Student Information and Abstracts

2:30-2:50pm
There are no presentations currently scheduled for this time period.

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3:00 – 3:20pm Session Presentations – Student Information and Abstracts

3:00-3:50pm / Virtual Room A – Moderator: Dr. Carolyn Barrientes

Team Presenters: Emma Morales, Yaritza Corona, Crysty Graves-Herrera, Cristian Sanchez, Avery Callaway, Cierra Noel Greer, Kendall Hughs
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Carolyn Barrientes (Theater)  
Title: Teniamos Todo” Talk-Back Session
Poster/Presentation: Pre-recorded video presentation with live follow-up – Undergraduate
Abstract: “The Sul Ross Theatre Program is proud to announce that two of our students were awarded Meritorious Achievement for Excellence in Playwriting by the Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival, Region 6.  Avery Callaway and Brian Phillip Welch were recognized for their plays “Quarantine PSA” and “Anne” as part of “Teníamos Todo” (We had Everything), the world premiere of short plays recently released online by the Sul Ross Theatre Program.  Additionally, Emma Morales and Gabrielle Ivey won Meritorious Achievement for Excellence in acting for their roles in ”Teníamos Todo.” SRSU Theatre is proud of the excellent work all of our students contributed to this production. We were also invited to present some of the short plays in February via a virtual festival hosted by KCACTF, Region 6. “Teníamos Todo” opened the 2020/2021 season for the Sul Ross Theatre Program. This was a collaboration between professional playwrights and Sul Ross Theatre students.  “Teníamos Todo” is an original, bilingual series of short scenes and monologues about Texans and the way they are coping with the “new normal” of life during a pandemic. “Teníamos Todo” was released on streaming platforms on November 24, 2020, and remains available for your viewing.

SESSION RECORDING  

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3:30 – 3:50pm Session Presentations – Student Information and Abstracts

3:30-3:50pm / Virtual Room A – Moderator: Dr. Benjamin Barrientes
SESSION CANCELLED

Presenter: Sharon Barrett 
Faculty Mentor: Benjamin Barrientes (Behavioral & Social Sciences)
Title: “Reserved to the People”: The Right to Give Birth in the United States
Poster/Presentation: Pre-recorded video presentation with live follow-up – Undergraduate
Abstract: “The Supreme Court discovered a doctrine of privacy in the Constitution, covering choices like contraception (Griswold, 1965), abortion (Roe, 1973), and sexual behavior (Lawrence, 2003). Does the state have a right to regulate women’s birth choices? Midwife Ina May Gaskin argued (1973) the Constitution reserves childbirth decisions, a private family matter, “to the people”: the parents and their chosen attendant. State midwifery licensing laws since 1900 have infringed that right. Although intended to reduce maternal and infant mortality, new health regulations targeted traditional autonomous midwives (especially those serving rural communities of color), replacing them with doctors and drugs.   
In the name of consumer protection, the state created a culture of male experts (Melissa Cheyney, 2010) whose industrial, medical-model training taught them that women’s bodies are machines requiring high-tech surveillance (Dahlen, 2016). Today 98% of American women birth under medical surveillance, often because other options are inaccessible. From the 1970s, midwives fought to restore women’s access to midwifery care; however, seeking external legitimacy cost them their autonomy. A licensed midwife contracts with the state and must practice “with institution, not with woman” (Mander & Melender, 2009). In states that prosecute unlicensed midwives, a mother cannot freely choose her birth attendant.   
Instead, the new paradigm (Maryn Green, 2020) asserts that powerful women don’t ask permission; they make choices while fully owning the responsibility. Constitutional rights apply to self-governing individuals; they must apply in birth or they apply nowhere. I cite the classical concept of liberty (rights balanced with responsibility) along with feminist understandings of autonomy (choice and consent) to argue for the rollback of state intrusion in birth.

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4:00 – 4:50pm Session Presentations – Student Information and Abstracts

4:00-4:50pm
There are no presentations currently scheduled for this time period.

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4:30 – 4:50pm Session Presentations – Student Information and Abstracts

4:30-4:50pm
There are no presentations currently scheduled for this time period.

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5:00 – 5:20pm Session Presentations – Student Information and Abstracts

5:00-5:50pm / Virtual Room A – Moderator: Dr. Kris Jorgenson

Presenter:
Daniel Carrillo
Faculty Mentor:
Dr. Kris Jorgenson (Math)
Title: 
Geometric Vanishes
Poster/Presentation:
Pre-recorded video presentation with live follow-up – Undergraduate
Abstract:
There is a simple geometric vanish that can be shown to elementary-level students, which consists of 13 parallel lines lying vertically on a piece of paper. By cutting this paper diagonally and moving the diagonal pieces inward, we get 12 lines instead. This “magical” illusion gives the sense that we made one of the 13 lines vanish, and implies that 13 lines equal 12 lines based on the demonstration. In a similar fashion, there exists geometric shapes of specific lengths, that are triangular or rectangular in shape, that create a larger geometric figure. By moving these “puzzle pieces,” we create a figure similar to the original figure, but then notice that one or more small square pieces of the original figure’s area have “vanished.” The question now is, how are these sorts of vanishes possible? This question can be answered using mathematics. With the help of some concepts of linear algebra and vectors, we can explain why it is that we have a missing area from a new figure that is different from the original figure by just moving around those same pieces. This type of manipulation of geometry has been referred to as a “geometric vanish.” In mathematics, the principle behind this type of geometric manipulation is called the “Principle of Concealed Distribution.” I wish to present a few geometric vanishes, and answer the question: “What conditions must exist in a geometric vanish for the amount of disappearing area to be a whole number?

PRESENTER VIDEO SESSION RECORDING

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5:30 – 5:50pm Session Presentations – Student Information and Abstracts

5:30-5:50pm
There are no presentations currently scheduled for this time period.

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